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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neuroscience Letters. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neuroscience Letters, 533, 2013 DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2012.10.054

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Effects of valence and arousal on written word recognition: Time course and ERP correlates

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Effects of valence and arousal on written word recognition : Time course and ERP correlates. / Citron, Francesca M. M.; Weekes, Brendan S.; Ferstl, Evelyn C.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 533, 15.01.2013, p. 90-95.

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Citron, Francesca M. M. ; Weekes, Brendan S. ; Ferstl, Evelyn C. / Effects of valence and arousal on written word recognition : Time course and ERP correlates. In: Neuroscience Letters. 2013 ; Vol. 533. pp. 90-95.

Bibtex

@article{6164cd539a49458eb1964aa9dde277d8,
title = "Effects of valence and arousal on written word recognition: Time course and ERP correlates",
abstract = "Models of affect assume a two-dimensional framework, composed of emotional valence and arousal. Although neuroimaging evidence supports a neuro-functional distinction of their effects during single word processing, electrophysiological studies have not yet compared the effects of arousal within the same category of valence (positive and negative). Here we investigate effects of arousal and valence on written lexical decision. Amplitude differences between emotion and neutral words were seen in the early posterior negativity (EPN), the late positive complex and in a sustained slow positivity. In addition, trends towards interactive effects of valence and arousal were observed in the EPN, showing larger amplitude for positive, high-arousal and negative, low-arousal words. The results provide initial evidence for interactions between arousal and valence during processing of positive words and highlight the importance of both variables in studies of emotional stimulus processing. Crown Copyright (C) 2012 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Valence, Arousal, ERP, EPN, LPC, Slow positivity, Lexical decision, Word processing, EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS, READING EMOTIONAL WORDS, PICTURES, P300, TASK",
author = "Citron, {Francesca M. M.} and Weekes, {Brendan S.} and Ferstl, {Evelyn C.}",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neuroscience Letters. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neuroscience Letters, 533, 2013 DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2012.10.054 ",
year = "2013",
month = jan,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.neulet.2012.10.054",
language = "English",
volume = "533",
pages = "90--95",
journal = "Neuroscience Letters",
issn = "0304-3940",
publisher = "ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of valence and arousal on written word recognition

T2 - Time course and ERP correlates

AU - Citron, Francesca M. M.

AU - Weekes, Brendan S.

AU - Ferstl, Evelyn C.

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neuroscience Letters. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neuroscience Letters, 533, 2013 DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2012.10.054

PY - 2013/1/15

Y1 - 2013/1/15

N2 - Models of affect assume a two-dimensional framework, composed of emotional valence and arousal. Although neuroimaging evidence supports a neuro-functional distinction of their effects during single word processing, electrophysiological studies have not yet compared the effects of arousal within the same category of valence (positive and negative). Here we investigate effects of arousal and valence on written lexical decision. Amplitude differences between emotion and neutral words were seen in the early posterior negativity (EPN), the late positive complex and in a sustained slow positivity. In addition, trends towards interactive effects of valence and arousal were observed in the EPN, showing larger amplitude for positive, high-arousal and negative, low-arousal words. The results provide initial evidence for interactions between arousal and valence during processing of positive words and highlight the importance of both variables in studies of emotional stimulus processing. Crown Copyright (C) 2012 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Models of affect assume a two-dimensional framework, composed of emotional valence and arousal. Although neuroimaging evidence supports a neuro-functional distinction of their effects during single word processing, electrophysiological studies have not yet compared the effects of arousal within the same category of valence (positive and negative). Here we investigate effects of arousal and valence on written lexical decision. Amplitude differences between emotion and neutral words were seen in the early posterior negativity (EPN), the late positive complex and in a sustained slow positivity. In addition, trends towards interactive effects of valence and arousal were observed in the EPN, showing larger amplitude for positive, high-arousal and negative, low-arousal words. The results provide initial evidence for interactions between arousal and valence during processing of positive words and highlight the importance of both variables in studies of emotional stimulus processing. Crown Copyright (C) 2012 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Valence

KW - Arousal

KW - ERP

KW - EPN

KW - LPC

KW - Slow positivity

KW - Lexical decision

KW - Word processing

KW - EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS

KW - READING EMOTIONAL WORDS

KW - PICTURES

KW - P300

KW - TASK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neulet.2012.10.054

DO - 10.1016/j.neulet.2012.10.054

M3 - Journal article

VL - 533

SP - 90

EP - 95

JO - Neuroscience Letters

JF - Neuroscience Letters

SN - 0304-3940

ER -