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Entering the 'post-shame era': the rise of illiberal democracy, populism and neo-authoritarianism in EUrope

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Entering the 'post-shame era' : the rise of illiberal democracy, populism and neo-authoritarianism in EUrope. / Wodak, Ruth.

In: Global Discourse, Vol. 9, No. 1, 31.01.2019, p. 195-213.

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@article{d15c14e7841b4e0cb7d6d01ea4c5443f,
title = "Entering the 'post-shame era': the rise of illiberal democracy, populism and neo-authoritarianism in EUrope",
abstract = "The term 'illiberal democracy', coined by Fareed Zakaria in 1997, has gained much traction, specifically since its use by Hungarian Prime Minster Victor Orb{\'a}n in 2014. Ever since, Orb{\'a}n and his governing party Fidesz have been implementing this vision resulting in major cutdowns on free speech, freedom of press, of various NGOs which support human rights, and so forth. Moreover, Fidesz won the 2018 national election with a strong focus on antiimmigration policies. Although Orb{\'a}n's restrictive migration policies were widely criticised during the so-called refugee crisis 2015, many EU member states have started to follow the Hungarian policy of closing borders and protecting the EU from asylum-seekers and an alleged invasion by Muslims. Hence, I claim that formerly taboo subjects and expressions in mainstream discourse are being accepted more and more ('normalisation'). Such normalisation goes hand in hand with a certain 'shamelessness': the limits of the sayable are shifting regarding both the frequency of lies and the violating of discourse conventions – as well as regarding repeated attacks on central democratic institutions. Normalising the assessment of migrants as a threat to inner security and a burden on the welfare state and education system must be perceived as an international development – generally instrumentalising a 'politics of fear'.",
keywords = "DIALOGUE, AUTHORITARIANISM, AUSTRIAN FREEDOM PARTY, EUPHEMISM, IDENTITY POLITICS, METAPHOR, CRITICAL DISCOURSE STUDIES, AUSTRIA, ARGUMENTATION, ANTI-POLITICS, ILLIBERALISM",
author = "Ruth Wodak",
year = "2019",
month = jan,
day = "31",
doi = "10.1332/204378919X15470487645420",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "195--213",
journal = "Global Discourse",
issn = "2326-9995",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Entering the 'post-shame era'

T2 - the rise of illiberal democracy, populism and neo-authoritarianism in EUrope

AU - Wodak, Ruth

PY - 2019/1/31

Y1 - 2019/1/31

N2 - The term 'illiberal democracy', coined by Fareed Zakaria in 1997, has gained much traction, specifically since its use by Hungarian Prime Minster Victor Orbán in 2014. Ever since, Orbán and his governing party Fidesz have been implementing this vision resulting in major cutdowns on free speech, freedom of press, of various NGOs which support human rights, and so forth. Moreover, Fidesz won the 2018 national election with a strong focus on antiimmigration policies. Although Orbán's restrictive migration policies were widely criticised during the so-called refugee crisis 2015, many EU member states have started to follow the Hungarian policy of closing borders and protecting the EU from asylum-seekers and an alleged invasion by Muslims. Hence, I claim that formerly taboo subjects and expressions in mainstream discourse are being accepted more and more ('normalisation'). Such normalisation goes hand in hand with a certain 'shamelessness': the limits of the sayable are shifting regarding both the frequency of lies and the violating of discourse conventions – as well as regarding repeated attacks on central democratic institutions. Normalising the assessment of migrants as a threat to inner security and a burden on the welfare state and education system must be perceived as an international development – generally instrumentalising a 'politics of fear'.

AB - The term 'illiberal democracy', coined by Fareed Zakaria in 1997, has gained much traction, specifically since its use by Hungarian Prime Minster Victor Orbán in 2014. Ever since, Orbán and his governing party Fidesz have been implementing this vision resulting in major cutdowns on free speech, freedom of press, of various NGOs which support human rights, and so forth. Moreover, Fidesz won the 2018 national election with a strong focus on antiimmigration policies. Although Orbán's restrictive migration policies were widely criticised during the so-called refugee crisis 2015, many EU member states have started to follow the Hungarian policy of closing borders and protecting the EU from asylum-seekers and an alleged invasion by Muslims. Hence, I claim that formerly taboo subjects and expressions in mainstream discourse are being accepted more and more ('normalisation'). Such normalisation goes hand in hand with a certain 'shamelessness': the limits of the sayable are shifting regarding both the frequency of lies and the violating of discourse conventions – as well as regarding repeated attacks on central democratic institutions. Normalising the assessment of migrants as a threat to inner security and a burden on the welfare state and education system must be perceived as an international development – generally instrumentalising a 'politics of fear'.

KW - DIALOGUE

KW - AUTHORITARIANISM

KW - AUSTRIAN FREEDOM PARTY

KW - EUPHEMISM

KW - IDENTITY POLITICS

KW - METAPHOR

KW - CRITICAL DISCOURSE STUDIES

KW - AUSTRIA

KW - ARGUMENTATION

KW - ANTI-POLITICS

KW - ILLIBERALISM

U2 - 10.1332/204378919X15470487645420

DO - 10.1332/204378919X15470487645420

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

SP - 195

EP - 213

JO - Global Discourse

JF - Global Discourse

SN - 2326-9995

IS - 1

ER -