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Everyday futures: A new interdisciplinary area of research

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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Everyday futures : A new interdisciplinary area of research. / Kuijer, Lenneke; Spurling, Nicola.

In: Interactions, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.03.2017, p. 34-37.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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Kuijer, Lenneke ; Spurling, Nicola. / Everyday futures : A new interdisciplinary area of research. In: Interactions. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 34-37.

Bibtex

@misc{3ee5425b918746b6855763a64281de59,
title = "Everyday futures: A new interdisciplinary area of research",
abstract = "An interdisciplinary group of researchers have formed the Everyday Futures Network in July 2016. An inaugural workshop was held at Lancaster University's Institute for Social Futures. Tim Chatterton and Georgia Newmarch's article examines the diversity of ways of living that coexists at any moment in time between different cultures and social groups. The authors argue that some members of the society, including technology designers and researchers, have more power than others to decide the types of futures that get promoted and prioritized. Daniel Welch, Margit Keller, and Guiliana Mandich point out that all too often future visions such as the circular economy gloss over the changed everyday lives essential to their realization. Maureen Meadows and Matthijs Kouw offer a method for developing multiple visions of a better everyday future, emphasizing plurality and potentially conflicting ideas of the good life.",
author = "Lenneke Kuijer and Nicola Spurling",
note = "{\textcopyright} ACM, 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Interactions, 24, 2, (2017) http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3041276",
year = "2017",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1145/3041276",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "34--37",
journal = "Interactions",
issn = "1072-5520",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Everyday futures

T2 - A new interdisciplinary area of research

AU - Kuijer, Lenneke

AU - Spurling, Nicola

N1 - © ACM, 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Interactions, 24, 2, (2017) http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3041276

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - An interdisciplinary group of researchers have formed the Everyday Futures Network in July 2016. An inaugural workshop was held at Lancaster University's Institute for Social Futures. Tim Chatterton and Georgia Newmarch's article examines the diversity of ways of living that coexists at any moment in time between different cultures and social groups. The authors argue that some members of the society, including technology designers and researchers, have more power than others to decide the types of futures that get promoted and prioritized. Daniel Welch, Margit Keller, and Guiliana Mandich point out that all too often future visions such as the circular economy gloss over the changed everyday lives essential to their realization. Maureen Meadows and Matthijs Kouw offer a method for developing multiple visions of a better everyday future, emphasizing plurality and potentially conflicting ideas of the good life.

AB - An interdisciplinary group of researchers have formed the Everyday Futures Network in July 2016. An inaugural workshop was held at Lancaster University's Institute for Social Futures. Tim Chatterton and Georgia Newmarch's article examines the diversity of ways of living that coexists at any moment in time between different cultures and social groups. The authors argue that some members of the society, including technology designers and researchers, have more power than others to decide the types of futures that get promoted and prioritized. Daniel Welch, Margit Keller, and Guiliana Mandich point out that all too often future visions such as the circular economy gloss over the changed everyday lives essential to their realization. Maureen Meadows and Matthijs Kouw offer a method for developing multiple visions of a better everyday future, emphasizing plurality and potentially conflicting ideas of the good life.

U2 - 10.1145/3041276

DO - 10.1145/3041276

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85014139364

VL - 24

SP - 34

EP - 37

JO - Interactions

JF - Interactions

SN - 1072-5520

ER -