Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Fair enough?

Electronic data

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Fair enough?: Women and fair trade

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Fair enough? Women and fair trade. / Thomas, Pete; McArdle, Louise.

In: Critical Perspectives on International Business, Vol. 8, No. 4, 2012, p. 277-294.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Thomas, P & McArdle, L 2012, 'Fair enough? Women and fair trade', Critical Perspectives on International Business, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 277-294. https://doi.org/10.1108/17422041211274165

APA

Thomas, P., & McArdle, L. (2012). Fair enough? Women and fair trade. Critical Perspectives on International Business, 8(4), 277-294. https://doi.org/10.1108/17422041211274165

Vancouver

Thomas P, McArdle L. Fair enough? Women and fair trade. Critical Perspectives on International Business. 2012;8(4):277-294. doi: 10.1108/17422041211274165

Author

Thomas, Pete ; McArdle, Louise. / Fair enough? Women and fair trade. In: Critical Perspectives on International Business. 2012 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 277-294.

Bibtex

@article{ccf9d8bc773f4694b36849ca8865cd75,
title = "Fair enough?: Women and fair trade",
abstract = "Purpose – This paper considers the impact of Fair Trade on producers with particular reference to women involved in Fair Trade production.Design/methodology/approach – The paper considers Fair Trade as an alternative to rational economic models of free trade and as a tool for development. A Gender and Development (GAD) perspective is used to assess whether Fair Trade empowers women in developing nations.Findings – Fair Trade offers an alternative to free trade within capitalist production and has a positive impact for producers. The impact on gender relations within producer communities is limited although there are benefits for some women involved in Fair Trade production.Research limitations/implications – The paper is based on secondary data and highlights the need for more focused research which explores the links between gender, cultural relations and Fair Trade.Originality/value – Understanding that while Fair Trade is usually considered as a positive developmental tool, its impacts are not homogeneous and are subject to the cultural gender relations which exist in producer communities. The paper highlights the need for a more systematic and longitudinal analysis of the impact of Fair Trade for women. ",
keywords = "Fairtrade, gender, development",
author = "Pete Thomas and Louise McArdle",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1108/17422041211274165",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "277--294",
journal = "Critical Perspectives on International Business",
issn = "1742-2043",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fair enough?

T2 - Women and fair trade

AU - Thomas, Pete

AU - McArdle, Louise

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Purpose – This paper considers the impact of Fair Trade on producers with particular reference to women involved in Fair Trade production.Design/methodology/approach – The paper considers Fair Trade as an alternative to rational economic models of free trade and as a tool for development. A Gender and Development (GAD) perspective is used to assess whether Fair Trade empowers women in developing nations.Findings – Fair Trade offers an alternative to free trade within capitalist production and has a positive impact for producers. The impact on gender relations within producer communities is limited although there are benefits for some women involved in Fair Trade production.Research limitations/implications – The paper is based on secondary data and highlights the need for more focused research which explores the links between gender, cultural relations and Fair Trade.Originality/value – Understanding that while Fair Trade is usually considered as a positive developmental tool, its impacts are not homogeneous and are subject to the cultural gender relations which exist in producer communities. The paper highlights the need for a more systematic and longitudinal analysis of the impact of Fair Trade for women.

AB - Purpose – This paper considers the impact of Fair Trade on producers with particular reference to women involved in Fair Trade production.Design/methodology/approach – The paper considers Fair Trade as an alternative to rational economic models of free trade and as a tool for development. A Gender and Development (GAD) perspective is used to assess whether Fair Trade empowers women in developing nations.Findings – Fair Trade offers an alternative to free trade within capitalist production and has a positive impact for producers. The impact on gender relations within producer communities is limited although there are benefits for some women involved in Fair Trade production.Research limitations/implications – The paper is based on secondary data and highlights the need for more focused research which explores the links between gender, cultural relations and Fair Trade.Originality/value – Understanding that while Fair Trade is usually considered as a positive developmental tool, its impacts are not homogeneous and are subject to the cultural gender relations which exist in producer communities. The paper highlights the need for a more systematic and longitudinal analysis of the impact of Fair Trade for women.

KW - Fairtrade

KW - gender

KW - development

U2 - 10.1108/17422041211274165

DO - 10.1108/17422041211274165

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 277

EP - 294

JO - Critical Perspectives on International Business

JF - Critical Perspectives on International Business

SN - 1742-2043

IS - 4

ER -