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Family functioning predicts outcomes for veterans in treatment for chronic posttraumatic stress disorder

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Family functioning predicts outcomes for veterans in treatment for chronic posttraumatic stress disorder. / Evans, Lynette; Cowlishaw, Sean; Hopwood, Malcolm.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 23, No. 4, 08.2009, p. 531-539.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Evans L, Cowlishaw S, Hopwood M. Family functioning predicts outcomes for veterans in treatment for chronic posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Family Psychology. 2009 Aug;23(4):531-539. doi: 10.1037/a0015877

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Evans, Lynette ; Cowlishaw, Sean ; Hopwood, Malcolm. / Family functioning predicts outcomes for veterans in treatment for chronic posttraumatic stress disorder. In: Journal of Family Psychology. 2009 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 531-539.

Bibtex

@article{ca8eb78d87db4d16b51f37de40dc704a,
title = "Family functioning predicts outcomes for veterans in treatment for chronic posttraumatic stress disorder",
abstract = "A longitudinal framework was used to examine the competing hypotheses of (a) whether family functioning predicts changes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms or (b) whether PTSD symptoms predict changes in family functioning. Veterans (N = 311) admitted to a treatment program completed a series of questionnaires at 3 time points: at intake, from intake to completion of a treatment program, and at the 6-month follow-up. Alcohol use and general mental health symptoms were also measured at intake. A cross-lagged panel model using structural equation modeling analyses indicated that family functioning was a moderate predictor of PTSD symptoms at posttreatment and at the 6-month follow-up. PTSD was not a significant predictor of family functioning across time and alcohol use, and general mental health symptoms did not affect the overall findings. Further analyses of PTSD symptom clusters indicated that the avoidance symptom cluster was most strongly related to family functioning. Targeting family relationships for treatment may be important in the future for veterans with PTSD.",
keywords = "Victoria, Questionnaires, Family Conflict, Humans, Aged, Personality Inventory, Alcohol Drinking, Longitudinal Studies, Psychometrics, Veterans, Combat Disorders, Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Treatment Outcome, Chronic Disease, Follow-Up Studies, Middle Aged, Male",
author = "Lynette Evans and Sean Cowlishaw and Malcolm Hopwood",
year = "2009",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1037/a0015877",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "531--539",
journal = "Journal of Family Psychology",
issn = "0893-3200",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Family functioning predicts outcomes for veterans in treatment for chronic posttraumatic stress disorder

AU - Evans, Lynette

AU - Cowlishaw, Sean

AU - Hopwood, Malcolm

PY - 2009/8

Y1 - 2009/8

N2 - A longitudinal framework was used to examine the competing hypotheses of (a) whether family functioning predicts changes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms or (b) whether PTSD symptoms predict changes in family functioning. Veterans (N = 311) admitted to a treatment program completed a series of questionnaires at 3 time points: at intake, from intake to completion of a treatment program, and at the 6-month follow-up. Alcohol use and general mental health symptoms were also measured at intake. A cross-lagged panel model using structural equation modeling analyses indicated that family functioning was a moderate predictor of PTSD symptoms at posttreatment and at the 6-month follow-up. PTSD was not a significant predictor of family functioning across time and alcohol use, and general mental health symptoms did not affect the overall findings. Further analyses of PTSD symptom clusters indicated that the avoidance symptom cluster was most strongly related to family functioning. Targeting family relationships for treatment may be important in the future for veterans with PTSD.

AB - A longitudinal framework was used to examine the competing hypotheses of (a) whether family functioning predicts changes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms or (b) whether PTSD symptoms predict changes in family functioning. Veterans (N = 311) admitted to a treatment program completed a series of questionnaires at 3 time points: at intake, from intake to completion of a treatment program, and at the 6-month follow-up. Alcohol use and general mental health symptoms were also measured at intake. A cross-lagged panel model using structural equation modeling analyses indicated that family functioning was a moderate predictor of PTSD symptoms at posttreatment and at the 6-month follow-up. PTSD was not a significant predictor of family functioning across time and alcohol use, and general mental health symptoms did not affect the overall findings. Further analyses of PTSD symptom clusters indicated that the avoidance symptom cluster was most strongly related to family functioning. Targeting family relationships for treatment may be important in the future for veterans with PTSD.

KW - Victoria

KW - Questionnaires

KW - Family Conflict

KW - Humans

KW - Aged

KW - Personality Inventory

KW - Alcohol Drinking

KW - Longitudinal Studies

KW - Psychometrics

KW - Veterans

KW - Combat Disorders

KW - Adaptation, Psychological

KW - Adult

KW - Treatment Outcome

KW - Chronic Disease

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Male

U2 - 10.1037/a0015877

DO - 10.1037/a0015877

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19685988

VL - 23

SP - 531

EP - 539

JO - Journal of Family Psychology

JF - Journal of Family Psychology

SN - 0893-3200

IS - 4

ER -