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Feeling the loss of feminism: Sarah Kane's Blasted and an experiential genealogy of contemporary women's playwriting

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Feeling the loss of feminism : Sarah Kane's Blasted and an experiential genealogy of contemporary women's playwriting. / Aston, Elaine.

In: Theatre Journal, Vol. 62, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 575-592.

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@article{c0e43d8adb544374b187086c4c14b467,
title = "Feeling the loss of feminism: Sarah Kane's Blasted and an experiential genealogy of contemporary women's playwriting",
abstract = "This essay disinters Blasted, the highly controversial debut play by Sarah Kane, from a masculinist cult of {"}in-yer-face-ism{"} in order to propose a genealogy of contemporary women's playwriting on the British stage characterized by an experiential drive to feeling the loss of feminism. Taking Blasted as a seminal point of reference, an experiential genealogy of women's writing is constructed by looking back at work by Rebecca Prichard and Judy Upton, and forward to millennial women's drama-in particular to politically angry newcomer debbie tucker green, whose theatre is examined as a savage critique of a world scarred by an acute lack of altruistic feeling for {"}others.{"} The essay concludes with brief reflections on the efforts made by new women writers to claim a space on the British stage.",
author = "Elaine Aston",
year = "2010",
month = dec,
language = "English",
volume = "62",
pages = "575--592",
journal = "Theatre Journal",
issn = "0192-2882",
publisher = "Johns Hopkins University Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feeling the loss of feminism

T2 - Sarah Kane's Blasted and an experiential genealogy of contemporary women's playwriting

AU - Aston, Elaine

PY - 2010/12

Y1 - 2010/12

N2 - This essay disinters Blasted, the highly controversial debut play by Sarah Kane, from a masculinist cult of "in-yer-face-ism" in order to propose a genealogy of contemporary women's playwriting on the British stage characterized by an experiential drive to feeling the loss of feminism. Taking Blasted as a seminal point of reference, an experiential genealogy of women's writing is constructed by looking back at work by Rebecca Prichard and Judy Upton, and forward to millennial women's drama-in particular to politically angry newcomer debbie tucker green, whose theatre is examined as a savage critique of a world scarred by an acute lack of altruistic feeling for "others." The essay concludes with brief reflections on the efforts made by new women writers to claim a space on the British stage.

AB - This essay disinters Blasted, the highly controversial debut play by Sarah Kane, from a masculinist cult of "in-yer-face-ism" in order to propose a genealogy of contemporary women's playwriting on the British stage characterized by an experiential drive to feeling the loss of feminism. Taking Blasted as a seminal point of reference, an experiential genealogy of women's writing is constructed by looking back at work by Rebecca Prichard and Judy Upton, and forward to millennial women's drama-in particular to politically angry newcomer debbie tucker green, whose theatre is examined as a savage critique of a world scarred by an acute lack of altruistic feeling for "others." The essay concludes with brief reflections on the efforts made by new women writers to claim a space on the British stage.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 62

SP - 575

EP - 592

JO - Theatre Journal

JF - Theatre Journal

SN - 0192-2882

IS - 4

ER -