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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Sociological Review, 65 (Suppl 2), 2017, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2017 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Sociological Review page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/sor on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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‘Floods’ of migrants, flows of care: Between climate displacement and global care chains

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‘Floods’ of migrants, flows of care : Between climate displacement and global care chains. / Clark, Nigel Halcomb; Bettini, Giovanni.

In: The Sociological Review, Vol. 65, No. 2 Suppl, 01.07.2017, p. 36-54.

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@article{179eaa3dfcdd48a9ba852706fd01f92c,
title = "{\textquoteleft}Floods{\textquoteright} of migrants, flows of care: Between climate displacement and global care chains",
abstract = "This paper explores the growing interface between climate displacement and participation in `global care chains{\textquoteright} under conditions in which climate change is already impacting on lives and livelihoods – especially in the Global South. Early engagements with {\textquoteleft}climate migration{\textquoteright} tended towards alarmist predictions of mass migration, triggering proposals to `secure{\textquoteright} potential host nations against anticipated influxes. Recently, apparently more sober and measured approaches have emerged in which labour migration is viewed as contributing positively to climate `resilience{\textquoteright}. We evaluate this policy turn in the light of everyday {\textquoteleft}ground level{\textquoteright} caring practices and adaptive responses to climate stress. The new approach, we argue, encourages more able and resourceful people from under-resourced, climate-vulnerable regions to join trans-local or transnational labour markets – which often equates with predominantly female care workers entering global care chains. Effectively, this means that those best equipped to provide care in places where it is most urgently needed end up providing care in relatively privileged, less climate-vulnerable places. Questioning the climate justice implications of this mobilization against the gradient of vulnerability, we offer suggestions about how climate policy could actually support caring practices in the places where ordinary people struggle at the sharp edge of global climate change. ",
keywords = "climate change, climate displacement, global care chains, migration, adaptation, climate justice, resilience",
author = "Clark, {Nigel Halcomb} and Giovanni Bettini",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Sociological Review, 65 (Suppl 2), 2017, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2017 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Sociological Review page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/sor on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/ ",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0081176917711078",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "36--54",
journal = "The Sociological Review",
issn = "0038-0261",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2 Suppl",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘Floods’ of migrants, flows of care

T2 - Between climate displacement and global care chains

AU - Clark, Nigel Halcomb

AU - Bettini, Giovanni

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Sociological Review, 65 (Suppl 2), 2017, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2017 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Sociological Review page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/sor on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - This paper explores the growing interface between climate displacement and participation in `global care chains’ under conditions in which climate change is already impacting on lives and livelihoods – especially in the Global South. Early engagements with ‘climate migration’ tended towards alarmist predictions of mass migration, triggering proposals to `secure’ potential host nations against anticipated influxes. Recently, apparently more sober and measured approaches have emerged in which labour migration is viewed as contributing positively to climate `resilience’. We evaluate this policy turn in the light of everyday ‘ground level’ caring practices and adaptive responses to climate stress. The new approach, we argue, encourages more able and resourceful people from under-resourced, climate-vulnerable regions to join trans-local or transnational labour markets – which often equates with predominantly female care workers entering global care chains. Effectively, this means that those best equipped to provide care in places where it is most urgently needed end up providing care in relatively privileged, less climate-vulnerable places. Questioning the climate justice implications of this mobilization against the gradient of vulnerability, we offer suggestions about how climate policy could actually support caring practices in the places where ordinary people struggle at the sharp edge of global climate change.

AB - This paper explores the growing interface between climate displacement and participation in `global care chains’ under conditions in which climate change is already impacting on lives and livelihoods – especially in the Global South. Early engagements with ‘climate migration’ tended towards alarmist predictions of mass migration, triggering proposals to `secure’ potential host nations against anticipated influxes. Recently, apparently more sober and measured approaches have emerged in which labour migration is viewed as contributing positively to climate `resilience’. We evaluate this policy turn in the light of everyday ‘ground level’ caring practices and adaptive responses to climate stress. The new approach, we argue, encourages more able and resourceful people from under-resourced, climate-vulnerable regions to join trans-local or transnational labour markets – which often equates with predominantly female care workers entering global care chains. Effectively, this means that those best equipped to provide care in places where it is most urgently needed end up providing care in relatively privileged, less climate-vulnerable places. Questioning the climate justice implications of this mobilization against the gradient of vulnerability, we offer suggestions about how climate policy could actually support caring practices in the places where ordinary people struggle at the sharp edge of global climate change.

KW - climate change

KW - climate displacement

KW - global care chains

KW - migration

KW - adaptation

KW - climate justice

KW - resilience

U2 - 10.1177/0081176917711078

DO - 10.1177/0081176917711078

M3 - Journal article

VL - 65

SP - 36

EP - 54

JO - The Sociological Review

JF - The Sociological Review

SN - 0038-0261

IS - 2 Suppl

ER -