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  • Bolan_ENVPOL_Lithium_pre-print

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Environmental Pollution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Environmental Pollution, 290, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2021.118067

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.16 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 31/08/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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From mine to mind and mobiles – Lithium contamination and its risk management

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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  • S. Bolan
  • S.A. Hoang
  • M. Tanveer
  • L. Wang
  • S. Bolan
  • P. Sooriyakumar
  • B. Robinson
  • H. Wijesekara
  • M. Wijesooriya
  • S. Keerthanan
  • M. Vithanage
  • B. Markert
  • S. Fränzle
  • S. Wünschmann
  • B. Sarkar
  • A. Vinu
  • M.B. Kirkham
  • K.H.M. Siddique
  • J. Rinklebe
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Article number118067
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/12/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Environmental Pollution
Volume290
Number of pages15
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date31/08/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

With the ever-increasing demand for lithium (Li) for portable energy storage devices, there is a global concern associated with environmental contamination of Li, via the production, use, and disposal of Li-containing products, including mobile phones and mood-stabilizing drugs. While geogenic Li is sparingly soluble, Li added to soil is one of the most mobile cations in soil, which can leach to groundwater and reach surface water through runoff. Lithium is readily taken up by plants and has relatively high plant accumulation coefficient, albeit the underlying mechanisms have not been well described. Therefore, soil contamination with Li could reach the food chain due to its mobility in surface- and ground-waters and uptake into plants. High environmental Li levels adversely affect the health of humans, animals, and plants. Lithium toxicity can be considerably managed through various remediation approaches such as immobilization using clay-like amendments and/or chelate-enhanced phytoremediation. This review integrates fundamental aspects of Li distribution and behaviour in terrestrial and aquatic environments in an effort to efficiently remediate Li-contaminated ecosystems. As research to date has not provided a clear picture of how the increased production and disposal of Li-based products adversely impact human and ecosystem health, there is an urgent need for further studies on this field.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Environmental Pollution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Environmental Pollution, 290, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2021.118067