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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Critical Social Policy, 36 (4), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Critical Social Policy page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/csp/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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From wage supplements to a ‘living wage’?: a commentary on the problems of predistribution in Britain’s summer budget of 2015

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From wage supplements to a ‘living wage’? a commentary on the problems of predistribution in Britain’s summer budget of 2015. / Grover, Christopher Geoffrey.

In: Critical Social Policy, Vol. 36, No. 4, 11.2016, p. 693-703.

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@article{56fb18a6b9f445138ff52b8bec6a3994,
title = "From wage supplements to a {\textquoteleft}living wage{\textquoteright}?: a commentary on the problems of predistribution in Britain{\textquoteright}s summer budget of 2015",
abstract = "This commentary focuses upon two developments – cuts to wage supplements and an increase in the National Minimum Wage – announced in the first full Conservative government budget in Britain for 18 years. The commentary analyses these through the concept of predistribution and critiques of it. The commentary argues that the two developments can be understood as a weak version of predistribution that will reproduce and deepen class and gender inequalities because of their bases in retrenching collective provision for households living in wage poverty, while increasing the emphasis upon market mechanisms (wages) as the predominate means of supporting such households.",
keywords = "lving wage, wage supplements, male breadwinner model, politics, budget, women, tax credits, universal credit, predistribution, redistribution, Conseratvive party, Labour Party, minimum wage",
author = "Grover, {Christopher Geoffrey}",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Critical Social Policy, 36 (4), 2016, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Critical Social Policy page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/csp/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/",
year = "2016",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1177/0261018316650193",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "693--703",
journal = "Critical Social Policy",
issn = "0261-0183",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - From wage supplements to a ‘living wage’?

T2 - a commentary on the problems of predistribution in Britain’s summer budget of 2015

AU - Grover, Christopher Geoffrey

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Critical Social Policy, 36 (4), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Critical Social Policy page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/csp/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - This commentary focuses upon two developments – cuts to wage supplements and an increase in the National Minimum Wage – announced in the first full Conservative government budget in Britain for 18 years. The commentary analyses these through the concept of predistribution and critiques of it. The commentary argues that the two developments can be understood as a weak version of predistribution that will reproduce and deepen class and gender inequalities because of their bases in retrenching collective provision for households living in wage poverty, while increasing the emphasis upon market mechanisms (wages) as the predominate means of supporting such households.

AB - This commentary focuses upon two developments – cuts to wage supplements and an increase in the National Minimum Wage – announced in the first full Conservative government budget in Britain for 18 years. The commentary analyses these through the concept of predistribution and critiques of it. The commentary argues that the two developments can be understood as a weak version of predistribution that will reproduce and deepen class and gender inequalities because of their bases in retrenching collective provision for households living in wage poverty, while increasing the emphasis upon market mechanisms (wages) as the predominate means of supporting such households.

KW - lving wage

KW - wage supplements

KW - male breadwinner model

KW - politics

KW - budget

KW - women

KW - tax credits

KW - universal credit

KW - predistribution

KW - redistribution

KW - Conseratvive party

KW - Labour Party

KW - minimum wage

U2 - 10.1177/0261018316650193

DO - 10.1177/0261018316650193

M3 - Journal article

VL - 36

SP - 693

EP - 703

JO - Critical Social Policy

JF - Critical Social Policy

SN - 0261-0183

IS - 4

ER -