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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, International Journal of Police Science and Management, 18 (1), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the International Journal of Police Science and Management page: http://psm.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

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Geographic profiling survey: a preliminary examination of geographic profilers’ views and experiences

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Geographic profiling survey : a preliminary examination of geographic profilers’ views and experiences. / Emeno, Karla; Bennell, Craig; Snook, Brent; Taylor, Paul Jonathon.

In: International Journal of Police Science and Management, Vol. 18, No. 1, 03.2016, p. 3-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Emeno, K, Bennell, C, Snook, B & Taylor, PJ 2016, 'Geographic profiling survey: a preliminary examination of geographic profilers’ views and experiences', International Journal of Police Science and Management, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 3-12. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461355715621070

APA

Emeno, K., Bennell, C., Snook, B., & Taylor, P. J. (2016). Geographic profiling survey: a preliminary examination of geographic profilers’ views and experiences. International Journal of Police Science and Management, 18(1), 3-12. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461355715621070

Vancouver

Emeno K, Bennell C, Snook B, Taylor PJ. Geographic profiling survey: a preliminary examination of geographic profilers’ views and experiences. International Journal of Police Science and Management. 2016 Mar;18(1):3-12. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461355715621070

Author

Emeno, Karla ; Bennell, Craig ; Snook, Brent ; Taylor, Paul Jonathon. / Geographic profiling survey : a preliminary examination of geographic profilers’ views and experiences. In: International Journal of Police Science and Management. 2016 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 3-12.

Bibtex

@article{cb69c77e5ffb44ccadf039e80ea72450,
title = "Geographic profiling survey: a preliminary examination of geographic profilers{\textquoteright} views and experiences",
abstract = "Geographic profiling (GP) is an investigative technique that involves predicting a serial offender{\textquoteright}s home location (or some other anchor point) based on where he or she committed a crime. Although the use of GP in police investigations appears to be on the rise, little is known about the procedure and how it is used. To examine these issues, a survey was distributed internationally to police professionals who have contributed GP advice to police investigations. The survey consisted of questions designed to assess: (a) how geographic profiles are constructed, (b) the perceived usefulness and accuracy of GP, (c) whether core GP conditions are examined before profiles are constructed, and (d) the types of cases in which GP is used. The results suggest that geographic profiles are commonly used in operational settings for a wide range of crime types. This appears to be true even when GP conditions are violated. In addition, general perceptions of GP accuracy andusefulness appear to be high, but this is particularly true for respondents who use computerized GP systems (compared with spatial distribution strategies, such as centroids, or educated guesses). Computerized GP systems are also the most commonly used GP approach among our respondents, especially for those who have received formal training in GP.Although preliminary in nature, the results from this study help enhance understanding of how GP is used in police investigations around the world, and under what conditions. The survey also provides directions for future research.",
author = "Karla Emeno and Craig Bennell and Brent Snook and Taylor, {Paul Jonathon}",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, International Journal of Police Science and Management, 18 (1), 2016, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the International Journal of Police Science and Management page: http://psm.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/ ",
year = "2016",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1177/1461355715621070",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "3--12",
journal = "International Journal of Police Science and Management",
issn = "1461-3557",
publisher = "Sage Publishing",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Geographic profiling survey

T2 - a preliminary examination of geographic profilers’ views and experiences

AU - Emeno, Karla

AU - Bennell, Craig

AU - Snook, Brent

AU - Taylor, Paul Jonathon

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, International Journal of Police Science and Management, 18 (1), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the International Journal of Police Science and Management page: http://psm.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

PY - 2016/3

Y1 - 2016/3

N2 - Geographic profiling (GP) is an investigative technique that involves predicting a serial offender’s home location (or some other anchor point) based on where he or she committed a crime. Although the use of GP in police investigations appears to be on the rise, little is known about the procedure and how it is used. To examine these issues, a survey was distributed internationally to police professionals who have contributed GP advice to police investigations. The survey consisted of questions designed to assess: (a) how geographic profiles are constructed, (b) the perceived usefulness and accuracy of GP, (c) whether core GP conditions are examined before profiles are constructed, and (d) the types of cases in which GP is used. The results suggest that geographic profiles are commonly used in operational settings for a wide range of crime types. This appears to be true even when GP conditions are violated. In addition, general perceptions of GP accuracy andusefulness appear to be high, but this is particularly true for respondents who use computerized GP systems (compared with spatial distribution strategies, such as centroids, or educated guesses). Computerized GP systems are also the most commonly used GP approach among our respondents, especially for those who have received formal training in GP.Although preliminary in nature, the results from this study help enhance understanding of how GP is used in police investigations around the world, and under what conditions. The survey also provides directions for future research.

AB - Geographic profiling (GP) is an investigative technique that involves predicting a serial offender’s home location (or some other anchor point) based on where he or she committed a crime. Although the use of GP in police investigations appears to be on the rise, little is known about the procedure and how it is used. To examine these issues, a survey was distributed internationally to police professionals who have contributed GP advice to police investigations. The survey consisted of questions designed to assess: (a) how geographic profiles are constructed, (b) the perceived usefulness and accuracy of GP, (c) whether core GP conditions are examined before profiles are constructed, and (d) the types of cases in which GP is used. The results suggest that geographic profiles are commonly used in operational settings for a wide range of crime types. This appears to be true even when GP conditions are violated. In addition, general perceptions of GP accuracy andusefulness appear to be high, but this is particularly true for respondents who use computerized GP systems (compared with spatial distribution strategies, such as centroids, or educated guesses). Computerized GP systems are also the most commonly used GP approach among our respondents, especially for those who have received formal training in GP.Although preliminary in nature, the results from this study help enhance understanding of how GP is used in police investigations around the world, and under what conditions. The survey also provides directions for future research.

U2 - 10.1177/1461355715621070

DO - 10.1177/1461355715621070

M3 - Journal article

VL - 18

SP - 3

EP - 12

JO - International Journal of Police Science and Management

JF - International Journal of Police Science and Management

SN - 1461-3557

IS - 1

ER -