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  • Preprint_Sato&Athanasopoulos_2018

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Cognition. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Cognition, 176, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2018.03.014

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Grammatical gender affects gender perception: Evidence for the structural-feedback hypothesis

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>07/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Cognition
Volume176
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)220-231
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date30/03/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Two experiments assessed the extent to which grammatical gender provides a predictive basis for bilinguals’ judgments about perceptual gender. In both experiments, French-English bilinguals and native English monolinguals were consecutively presented with images of objects manipulated for their (i) conceptual gender association and (ii) grammatical gender category and were instructed to make a decision on a subsequent target face. The experiments differed in the implicitness of the association between the object primes and target faces. Results revealed that when prior knowledge sources such as conceptual gender can be strategically used to resolve the immediate task (Experiment 1), this information was readily extracted and employed. However, grammatical gender demonstrated a more robust and persisting effect on the bilinguals’ judgments, indicating that the retrieval of obligatory grammatical information is automatic and modulates perceptual judgments (Experiment 2). These results suggest that grammar enables an effective and robust means to access prior knowledge which may be independent of task requirements.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Cognition. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Cognition, 176, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2018.03.014