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How well can we predict and measure metal speciation in freshwaters?

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How well can we predict and measure metal speciation in freshwaters? / Hamilton-Taylor, John; Ahmed, Imad; Davison, William; Zhang, Hao.

In: Environmental Chemistry, Vol. 8, No. 5, 04.10.2011, p. 461-465.

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@article{8280ba481faa465c9624ba0fb69bb21f,
title = "How well can we predict and measure metal speciation in freshwaters?",
abstract = "The {\textquoteleft}speciation{\textquoteright} of metals is concerned with their different chemical and physical forms, a detailed knowledge of which is essential to understand what happens to metals in lakes and rivers, and their effects on living organisms. There have been many advances in recent years in our ability both to measure and predict metal speciation in natural waters, but it is not clear just how accurately these can be applied under field conditions. The current state of play is assessed to provide a better understanding of the related uncertainties, and suggestions are made for ways to reduce these uncertainties and possibly improve our predictive capabilities.",
keywords = "Chemical speciation,, Freshwater, modelling, WHAM, NICA–Donnan, DGT",
author = "John Hamilton-Taylor and Imad Ahmed and William Davison and Hao Zhang",
year = "2011",
month = oct,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1071/EN11031",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "461--465",
journal = "Environmental Chemistry",
issn = "1448-2517",
publisher = "CSIRO",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How well can we predict and measure metal speciation in freshwaters?

AU - Hamilton-Taylor, John

AU - Ahmed, Imad

AU - Davison, William

AU - Zhang, Hao

PY - 2011/10/4

Y1 - 2011/10/4

N2 - The ‘speciation’ of metals is concerned with their different chemical and physical forms, a detailed knowledge of which is essential to understand what happens to metals in lakes and rivers, and their effects on living organisms. There have been many advances in recent years in our ability both to measure and predict metal speciation in natural waters, but it is not clear just how accurately these can be applied under field conditions. The current state of play is assessed to provide a better understanding of the related uncertainties, and suggestions are made for ways to reduce these uncertainties and possibly improve our predictive capabilities.

AB - The ‘speciation’ of metals is concerned with their different chemical and physical forms, a detailed knowledge of which is essential to understand what happens to metals in lakes and rivers, and their effects on living organisms. There have been many advances in recent years in our ability both to measure and predict metal speciation in natural waters, but it is not clear just how accurately these can be applied under field conditions. The current state of play is assessed to provide a better understanding of the related uncertainties, and suggestions are made for ways to reduce these uncertainties and possibly improve our predictive capabilities.

KW - Chemical speciation,

KW - Freshwater

KW - modelling

KW - WHAM

KW - NICA–Donnan

KW - DGT

U2 - 10.1071/EN11031

DO - 10.1071/EN11031

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 461

EP - 465

JO - Environmental Chemistry

JF - Environmental Chemistry

SN - 1448-2517

IS - 5

ER -