Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > In the Balance
View graph of relations

In the Balance: Making Financial Information Accessible

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

In the Balance : Making Financial Information Accessible. / Thompson, Leanne; Reeves, Christopher; Masters, Kate.

In: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Vol. 17, No. 2, 05.1999, p. 65-70.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Thompson, L, Reeves, C & Masters, K 1999, 'In the Balance: Making Financial Information Accessible', British Journal of Visual Impairment, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 65-70. https://doi.org/10.1177/026461969701700207

APA

Thompson, L., Reeves, C., & Masters, K. (1999). In the Balance: Making Financial Information Accessible. British Journal of Visual Impairment, 17(2), 65-70. https://doi.org/10.1177/026461969701700207

Vancouver

Thompson L, Reeves C, Masters K. In the Balance: Making Financial Information Accessible. British Journal of Visual Impairment. 1999 May;17(2):65-70. https://doi.org/10.1177/026461969701700207

Author

Thompson, Leanne ; Reeves, Christopher ; Masters, Kate. / In the Balance : Making Financial Information Accessible. In: British Journal of Visual Impairment. 1999 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 65-70.

Bibtex

@article{3bac6235d9024e19bdd4c5579a10504b,
title = "In the Balance: Making Financial Information Accessible",
abstract = "Evaluation of financial document design formed the central part of a recent research project by the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB). The study, entitled The Presentation of Financial Information for Visually Impaired People, investigated financial information design in four alternative formats: large print; Braille; audio cassette; and computer disk. The results have raised some interesting implications for designers of financial documentation. Several design feature preferences were drawn from the research which are being recommended as general guidelines for financial information design. These results are outlined within a discussion of the importance of this type of research not only for visually impaired people themselves but also for financial institutions as a result of impending legal requirements under the Disability Discrimination Act (1995). Future research on this topic by the RNIB is discussed, as are some thoughts on incorporating creativity with accessible design. ",
author = "Leanne Thompson and Christopher Reeves and Kate Masters",
year = "1999",
month = may,
doi = "10.1177/026461969701700207",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "65--70",
journal = "British Journal of Visual Impairment",
issn = "0264-6196",
publisher = "Association for the Education and Welfare of the Visually Handicapped",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - In the Balance

T2 - Making Financial Information Accessible

AU - Thompson, Leanne

AU - Reeves, Christopher

AU - Masters, Kate

PY - 1999/5

Y1 - 1999/5

N2 - Evaluation of financial document design formed the central part of a recent research project by the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB). The study, entitled The Presentation of Financial Information for Visually Impaired People, investigated financial information design in four alternative formats: large print; Braille; audio cassette; and computer disk. The results have raised some interesting implications for designers of financial documentation. Several design feature preferences were drawn from the research which are being recommended as general guidelines for financial information design. These results are outlined within a discussion of the importance of this type of research not only for visually impaired people themselves but also for financial institutions as a result of impending legal requirements under the Disability Discrimination Act (1995). Future research on this topic by the RNIB is discussed, as are some thoughts on incorporating creativity with accessible design.

AB - Evaluation of financial document design formed the central part of a recent research project by the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB). The study, entitled The Presentation of Financial Information for Visually Impaired People, investigated financial information design in four alternative formats: large print; Braille; audio cassette; and computer disk. The results have raised some interesting implications for designers of financial documentation. Several design feature preferences were drawn from the research which are being recommended as general guidelines for financial information design. These results are outlined within a discussion of the importance of this type of research not only for visually impaired people themselves but also for financial institutions as a result of impending legal requirements under the Disability Discrimination Act (1995). Future research on this topic by the RNIB is discussed, as are some thoughts on incorporating creativity with accessible design.

U2 - 10.1177/026461969701700207

DO - 10.1177/026461969701700207

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 65

EP - 70

JO - British Journal of Visual Impairment

JF - British Journal of Visual Impairment

SN - 0264-6196

IS - 2

ER -