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  • Accepted Manuscript - James Taylor, Inside and Outside the London Stock Exchange

    Rights statement: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/enterprise-and-society/article/inside-and-outside-the-london-stock-exchange-stockbrokers-and-speculation-in-late-victorian-britain/1F013A72845DC657B1C875020E5E7D58 The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Enterprise and Society, 22, 3, pp 842-877 2021, © 2020 Cambridge University Press.

    Accepted author manuscript, 352 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Inside and Outside the London Stock Exchange: Stockbrokers and Speculation in Late Victorian Britain

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/09/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Enterprise and Society
Issue number3
Volume22
Number of pages36
Pages (from-to)842-877
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date3/07/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The nineteenth-century growth of the London Stock Exchange and the development of the market for stocks and shares are familiar topics of study. This article provides an alternative perspective on them by decentering the London Stock Exchange and focusing instead on the activities of “outside stockbrokers” – those who operated outside the Stock Exchange and its rules. Often regarded as peripheral, these brokers were in fact instrumental in promoting investment and speculation to a mass market. The article examines their innovative methods, and seeks to explain why they were so successful, despite persistent – and sometimes justifiable – accusations of fraud. It suggests how perspectives from the history of consumer society provide fresh insights into the market for financial products. And it underlines the importance of looking outside formal markets, arguing that focusing on “fringe” markets can help us to rethink boundaries, relations, and practices in the history of capitalism.

Bibliographic note

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/enterprise-and-society/article/inside-and-outside-the-london-stock-exchange-stockbrokers-and-speculation-in-late-victorian-britain/1F013A72845DC657B1C875020E5E7D58 The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Enterprise and Society, 22, 3, pp 842-877 2021, © 2020 Cambridge University Press.