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Integration as a general boundary condition on retrieval-induced forgetting

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Integration as a general boundary condition on retrieval-induced forgetting. / Anderson, Michael C. ; McCulloch, Kathleen C. .

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, Vol. 25, No. 3, 05.1999, p. 608-629.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Anderson, MC & McCulloch, KC 1999, 'Integration as a general boundary condition on retrieval-induced forgetting', Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 608-629. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-7393.25.3.608

APA

Anderson, M. C., & McCulloch, K. C. (1999). Integration as a general boundary condition on retrieval-induced forgetting. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 25(3), 608-629. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-7393.25.3.608

Vancouver

Anderson MC, McCulloch KC. Integration as a general boundary condition on retrieval-induced forgetting. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 1999 May;25(3):608-629. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-7393.25.3.608

Author

Anderson, Michael C. ; McCulloch, Kathleen C. . / Integration as a general boundary condition on retrieval-induced forgetting. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 1999 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 608-629.

Bibtex

@article{c70cd4c1aff04804a2f882b3d6e7171b,
title = "Integration as a general boundary condition on retrieval-induced forgetting",
abstract = "When people form connections between several memories that share a common retrieval cue, the tendency for those memories to interfere with one another during later retrieval attempts is often eliminated. Three experiments examined whether forming such connections might also protect memories from retrieval-induced forgetting, the phenomenon in which retrieving some associates of a cue leads to the suppression of others that interfere during retrieval (M. C. Anderson, E. L. Bjork, & R. A. Bjork, 1994). All 3 experiments found that instructing subjects to interrelate category exemplars during an initial study phase reduced retrieval-induced forgetting. Postexperimental questionnaires indicated that even when people were not instructed to interrelate exemplars, they often did so spontaneously and that this spontaneous integration also protected people from impairment. These findings, together with others obtained in different experimental settings, suggest that complex knowledge structures composed of highly interconnected components may be especially resistant to retrieval-induced forgetting.",
author = "Anderson, {Michael C.} and McCulloch, {Kathleen C.}",
year = "1999",
month = may,
doi = "10.1037/0278-7393.25.3.608",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "608--629",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition",
issn = "0278-7393",
publisher = "AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integration as a general boundary condition on retrieval-induced forgetting

AU - Anderson, Michael C.

AU - McCulloch, Kathleen C.

PY - 1999/5

Y1 - 1999/5

N2 - When people form connections between several memories that share a common retrieval cue, the tendency for those memories to interfere with one another during later retrieval attempts is often eliminated. Three experiments examined whether forming such connections might also protect memories from retrieval-induced forgetting, the phenomenon in which retrieving some associates of a cue leads to the suppression of others that interfere during retrieval (M. C. Anderson, E. L. Bjork, & R. A. Bjork, 1994). All 3 experiments found that instructing subjects to interrelate category exemplars during an initial study phase reduced retrieval-induced forgetting. Postexperimental questionnaires indicated that even when people were not instructed to interrelate exemplars, they often did so spontaneously and that this spontaneous integration also protected people from impairment. These findings, together with others obtained in different experimental settings, suggest that complex knowledge structures composed of highly interconnected components may be especially resistant to retrieval-induced forgetting.

AB - When people form connections between several memories that share a common retrieval cue, the tendency for those memories to interfere with one another during later retrieval attempts is often eliminated. Three experiments examined whether forming such connections might also protect memories from retrieval-induced forgetting, the phenomenon in which retrieving some associates of a cue leads to the suppression of others that interfere during retrieval (M. C. Anderson, E. L. Bjork, & R. A. Bjork, 1994). All 3 experiments found that instructing subjects to interrelate category exemplars during an initial study phase reduced retrieval-induced forgetting. Postexperimental questionnaires indicated that even when people were not instructed to interrelate exemplars, they often did so spontaneously and that this spontaneous integration also protected people from impairment. These findings, together with others obtained in different experimental settings, suggest that complex knowledge structures composed of highly interconnected components may be especially resistant to retrieval-induced forgetting.

U2 - 10.1037/0278-7393.25.3.608

DO - 10.1037/0278-7393.25.3.608

M3 - Journal article

VL - 25

SP - 608

EP - 629

JO - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

JF - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

SN - 0278-7393

IS - 3

ER -