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Just do it: Literacies, everyday learning and the irrelevance of pedagogy.

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Just do it: Literacies, everyday learning and the irrelevance of pedagogy. / Hamilton, Mary.

In: Studies in the Education of Adults, Vol. 38, No. 2, 2006, p. 125-140.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Hamilton M. Just do it: Literacies, everyday learning and the irrelevance of pedagogy. Studies in the Education of Adults. 2006;38(2):125-140.

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Hamilton, Mary. / Just do it: Literacies, everyday learning and the irrelevance of pedagogy. In: Studies in the Education of Adults. 2006 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 125-140.

Bibtex

@article{23f98e6e4a2148d099eb8bda92eebfc2,
title = "Just do it: Literacies, everyday learning and the irrelevance of pedagogy.",
abstract = "This paper introduces the significant body of research on everyday literacies that has developed over the last 20 years and links it with the concerns of those working in the field of lifelong learning.[1] It starts by briefly introducing debates about adult informal learning. It goes on to discuss ethnographic and interview studies of everyday learning and literacies, using both print and electronic media. It presents some of the new insights and orthodoxies from this research and discusses the challenges it poses to formal pedagogies. The paper goes on to identify some key issues that still need to be resolved, looking at the strengths and limitations of both informal and formal learning opportunities for literacy. For example, everyday networks have both strengths and limitations for learning; local knowledge resources are flexible but unevenly spread. The paper closes by looking at the implications of this work for the organisation of literacy learning opportunities for adults.",
keywords = "adult everyday informal learning learning literacies pedagogy",
author = "Mary Hamilton",
year = "2006",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "125--140",
journal = "Studies in the Education of Adults",
issn = "0266-0830",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Just do it: Literacies, everyday learning and the irrelevance of pedagogy.

AU - Hamilton, Mary

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - This paper introduces the significant body of research on everyday literacies that has developed over the last 20 years and links it with the concerns of those working in the field of lifelong learning.[1] It starts by briefly introducing debates about adult informal learning. It goes on to discuss ethnographic and interview studies of everyday learning and literacies, using both print and electronic media. It presents some of the new insights and orthodoxies from this research and discusses the challenges it poses to formal pedagogies. The paper goes on to identify some key issues that still need to be resolved, looking at the strengths and limitations of both informal and formal learning opportunities for literacy. For example, everyday networks have both strengths and limitations for learning; local knowledge resources are flexible but unevenly spread. The paper closes by looking at the implications of this work for the organisation of literacy learning opportunities for adults.

AB - This paper introduces the significant body of research on everyday literacies that has developed over the last 20 years and links it with the concerns of those working in the field of lifelong learning.[1] It starts by briefly introducing debates about adult informal learning. It goes on to discuss ethnographic and interview studies of everyday learning and literacies, using both print and electronic media. It presents some of the new insights and orthodoxies from this research and discusses the challenges it poses to formal pedagogies. The paper goes on to identify some key issues that still need to be resolved, looking at the strengths and limitations of both informal and formal learning opportunities for literacy. For example, everyday networks have both strengths and limitations for learning; local knowledge resources are flexible but unevenly spread. The paper closes by looking at the implications of this work for the organisation of literacy learning opportunities for adults.

KW - adult everyday informal learning learning literacies pedagogy

M3 - Journal article

VL - 38

SP - 125

EP - 140

JO - Studies in the Education of Adults

JF - Studies in the Education of Adults

SN - 0266-0830

IS - 2

ER -