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Large tree mortality and the decline of forest biomass following Amazonian wildfires.

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Large tree mortality and the decline of forest biomass following Amazonian wildfires. / Barlow, Jos; Peres, Carlos A.; Lagan, Bernard O.; Haugaasen, Torbjorn.

In: Ecology Letters, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 605-8.

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Barlow, Jos ; Peres, Carlos A. ; Lagan, Bernard O. ; Haugaasen, Torbjorn. / Large tree mortality and the decline of forest biomass following Amazonian wildfires. In: Ecology Letters. 2003 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 605-8.

Bibtex

@article{004a67f3009e49e2862881f77eb99a15,
title = "Large tree mortality and the decline of forest biomass following Amazonian wildfires.",
abstract = "Surface fires in Amazonian forests could contribute as much as 5% of annual carbon emissions from all anthropogenic sources during severe El Ni{\~n}o years. However, these estimates are based on short-term figures of post-burn tree mortality, when large thicker barked trees (representing a disproportionate amount of the forest biomass) appear to resist the fires. On the basis of a longer term study, we report that the mortality of large trees increased markedly between 1 and 3 years, more than doubling current estimates of biomass loss and committed carbon emissions from low-intensity fires in tropical forests.",
keywords = "Brazil • carbon emissions • El Ni{\~n}o • forest fire • tropical forest",
author = "Jos Barlow and Peres, {Carlos A.} and Lagan, {Bernard O.} and Torbjorn Haugaasen",
year = "2003",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1046/j.1461-0248.2003.00394.x",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "605--8",
journal = "Ecology Letters",
issn = "1461-023X",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Large tree mortality and the decline of forest biomass following Amazonian wildfires.

AU - Barlow, Jos

AU - Peres, Carlos A.

AU - Lagan, Bernard O.

AU - Haugaasen, Torbjorn

PY - 2003/1

Y1 - 2003/1

N2 - Surface fires in Amazonian forests could contribute as much as 5% of annual carbon emissions from all anthropogenic sources during severe El Niño years. However, these estimates are based on short-term figures of post-burn tree mortality, when large thicker barked trees (representing a disproportionate amount of the forest biomass) appear to resist the fires. On the basis of a longer term study, we report that the mortality of large trees increased markedly between 1 and 3 years, more than doubling current estimates of biomass loss and committed carbon emissions from low-intensity fires in tropical forests.

AB - Surface fires in Amazonian forests could contribute as much as 5% of annual carbon emissions from all anthropogenic sources during severe El Niño years. However, these estimates are based on short-term figures of post-burn tree mortality, when large thicker barked trees (representing a disproportionate amount of the forest biomass) appear to resist the fires. On the basis of a longer term study, we report that the mortality of large trees increased markedly between 1 and 3 years, more than doubling current estimates of biomass loss and committed carbon emissions from low-intensity fires in tropical forests.

KW - Brazil • carbon emissions • El Niño • forest fire • tropical forest

U2 - 10.1046/j.1461-0248.2003.00394.x

DO - 10.1046/j.1461-0248.2003.00394.x

M3 - Journal article

VL - 6

SP - 605

EP - 608

JO - Ecology Letters

JF - Ecology Letters

SN - 1461-023X

IS - 1

ER -