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Last in, first out: brain economy in times of limited resources

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Last in, first out : brain economy in times of limited resources. / Sunram-Lea, Sandra-Ilona.

In: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology , Vol. 17, No. 12, 01.09.2017, p. 2586-2596.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstractpeer-review

Harvard

Sunram-Lea, S-I 2017, 'Last in, first out: brain economy in times of limited resources', The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology , vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 2586-2596. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2017.1365417

APA

Vancouver

Sunram-Lea S-I. Last in, first out: brain economy in times of limited resources. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology . 2017 Sep 1;17(12):2586-2596. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2017.1365417

Author

Sunram-Lea, Sandra-Ilona. / Last in, first out : brain economy in times of limited resources. In: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology . 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 12. pp. 2586-2596.

Bibtex

@article{59b81ff3a63b4f279bdfca3ea78349c5,
title = "Last in, first out: brain economy in times of limited resources",
abstract = "It has been argued that cognitive abilities that developed last ontogenetically are likely the first to become impaired when cognitive and/or physiological resources are compromised. In phylogeny as in ontogeny, the prefrontal cortex is a late developing region of the cortex. Late maturing areas of the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex are primarily involved in higher executive functions. One crucial function of executive control is to enable self-control, i.e. the ability to inhibit automatic or habitual responses. Self-control requires effort and completing two successive self-control tasks, typically, produces a temporary drop in performance in the second task. It has been suggested that self-control requires an extensive amount of energy and when this energy is depleted, later self-control ability is adversely affected. In this talk, a series of experiments exploring the relationship between glucose availability and self-control performance using a neuro-cognitive approach will be presented. The data suggest that although frontal cortical areas are susceptible to limitations in fuel supply, level of motivation to perform a task can moderate the effect of impaired self-control performance following prior exertion. The results suggest that allocation of resources to limited-capacity systems is moderated by motivational factors. Putative underlying mechanisms regulating allocation of resources will be discussed. ",
author = "Sandra-Ilona Sunram-Lea",
year = "2017",
month = sep,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/17470218.2017.1365417",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "2586--2596",
journal = "The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology ",
issn = "1747-0218",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "12",
note = "Experimental Psychology Society meeting ; Conference date: 12-07-2017 Through 14-07-2017",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Last in, first out

T2 - Experimental Psychology Society meeting

AU - Sunram-Lea, Sandra-Ilona

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - It has been argued that cognitive abilities that developed last ontogenetically are likely the first to become impaired when cognitive and/or physiological resources are compromised. In phylogeny as in ontogeny, the prefrontal cortex is a late developing region of the cortex. Late maturing areas of the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex are primarily involved in higher executive functions. One crucial function of executive control is to enable self-control, i.e. the ability to inhibit automatic or habitual responses. Self-control requires effort and completing two successive self-control tasks, typically, produces a temporary drop in performance in the second task. It has been suggested that self-control requires an extensive amount of energy and when this energy is depleted, later self-control ability is adversely affected. In this talk, a series of experiments exploring the relationship between glucose availability and self-control performance using a neuro-cognitive approach will be presented. The data suggest that although frontal cortical areas are susceptible to limitations in fuel supply, level of motivation to perform a task can moderate the effect of impaired self-control performance following prior exertion. The results suggest that allocation of resources to limited-capacity systems is moderated by motivational factors. Putative underlying mechanisms regulating allocation of resources will be discussed.

AB - It has been argued that cognitive abilities that developed last ontogenetically are likely the first to become impaired when cognitive and/or physiological resources are compromised. In phylogeny as in ontogeny, the prefrontal cortex is a late developing region of the cortex. Late maturing areas of the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex are primarily involved in higher executive functions. One crucial function of executive control is to enable self-control, i.e. the ability to inhibit automatic or habitual responses. Self-control requires effort and completing two successive self-control tasks, typically, produces a temporary drop in performance in the second task. It has been suggested that self-control requires an extensive amount of energy and when this energy is depleted, later self-control ability is adversely affected. In this talk, a series of experiments exploring the relationship between glucose availability and self-control performance using a neuro-cognitive approach will be presented. The data suggest that although frontal cortical areas are susceptible to limitations in fuel supply, level of motivation to perform a task can moderate the effect of impaired self-control performance following prior exertion. The results suggest that allocation of resources to limited-capacity systems is moderated by motivational factors. Putative underlying mechanisms regulating allocation of resources will be discussed.

U2 - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1365417

DO - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1365417

M3 - Meeting abstract

VL - 17

SP - 2586

EP - 2596

JO - The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

JF - The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

SN - 1747-0218

IS - 12

Y2 - 12 July 2017 through 14 July 2017

ER -