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Learning to assign lexical stress during reading aloud: Corpus, behavioral, and computational investigations

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Learning to assign lexical stress during reading aloud: Corpus, behavioral, and computational investigations. / Arciuli, Joanne; Monaghan, Padraic; Seva, Nada.

In: Journal of Memory and Language, Vol. 63, No. 2, 08.2010, p. 180-196.

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Arciuli, Joanne ; Monaghan, Padraic ; Seva, Nada. / Learning to assign lexical stress during reading aloud: Corpus, behavioral, and computational investigations. In: Journal of Memory and Language. 2010 ; Vol. 63, No. 2. pp. 180-196.

Bibtex

@article{745b7e0b03964cada3f21fd9f34b2864,
title = "Learning to assign lexical stress during reading aloud: Corpus, behavioral, and computational investigations",
abstract = "Models of reading aloud have tended to focus on the mapping between graphemes and phonemes in monosyllables. Critical adaptations of these models are required when considering the reading of polysyllables, which constitute over 90% of word types in English. In this paper, we examined one such adaptation - the process of stress assignment in learning to read. We used a triangulation of corpus, behavioral, and computational modeling techniques. A corpus analysis of age-appropriate reading materials for children aged 5-12 years revealed that the beginnings and endings of English bisyllabic words are highly predictive of stress position, but that endings are more reliable cues in texts for older children. Children aged 5-12 years revealed sensitivity to both the beginnings and endings when reading nonwords, but older children relied more on endings for determining stress assignment. A computational model that learned to map orthography onto stress showed the same age-related trajectory as the children when assigning stress to nonwords. These results reflect the gradual process of learning the statistical properties of written input and provide key constraints for adequate models of reading aloud. Crown Copyright (C) 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Lexical stress, Stress assignment, Probabilistic cues, Statistical learning, Orthography, Reading, Reading aloud, Reading acquisition, Reading development, Visual word recognition, SPELLING-SOUND CONSISTENCY, VISUAL WORD RECOGNITION, DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA, LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT, ORTHOGRAPHIC CUES, ENGLISH, MODEL, SENSITIVITY, CHILDREN, GREEK",
author = "Joanne Arciuli and Padraic Monaghan and Nada Seva",
year = "2010",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1016/j.jml.2010.03.005",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "180--196",
journal = "Journal of Memory and Language",
issn = "0749-596X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Learning to assign lexical stress during reading aloud: Corpus, behavioral, and computational investigations

AU - Arciuli, Joanne

AU - Monaghan, Padraic

AU - Seva, Nada

PY - 2010/8

Y1 - 2010/8

N2 - Models of reading aloud have tended to focus on the mapping between graphemes and phonemes in monosyllables. Critical adaptations of these models are required when considering the reading of polysyllables, which constitute over 90% of word types in English. In this paper, we examined one such adaptation - the process of stress assignment in learning to read. We used a triangulation of corpus, behavioral, and computational modeling techniques. A corpus analysis of age-appropriate reading materials for children aged 5-12 years revealed that the beginnings and endings of English bisyllabic words are highly predictive of stress position, but that endings are more reliable cues in texts for older children. Children aged 5-12 years revealed sensitivity to both the beginnings and endings when reading nonwords, but older children relied more on endings for determining stress assignment. A computational model that learned to map orthography onto stress showed the same age-related trajectory as the children when assigning stress to nonwords. These results reflect the gradual process of learning the statistical properties of written input and provide key constraints for adequate models of reading aloud. Crown Copyright (C) 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - Models of reading aloud have tended to focus on the mapping between graphemes and phonemes in monosyllables. Critical adaptations of these models are required when considering the reading of polysyllables, which constitute over 90% of word types in English. In this paper, we examined one such adaptation - the process of stress assignment in learning to read. We used a triangulation of corpus, behavioral, and computational modeling techniques. A corpus analysis of age-appropriate reading materials for children aged 5-12 years revealed that the beginnings and endings of English bisyllabic words are highly predictive of stress position, but that endings are more reliable cues in texts for older children. Children aged 5-12 years revealed sensitivity to both the beginnings and endings when reading nonwords, but older children relied more on endings for determining stress assignment. A computational model that learned to map orthography onto stress showed the same age-related trajectory as the children when assigning stress to nonwords. These results reflect the gradual process of learning the statistical properties of written input and provide key constraints for adequate models of reading aloud. Crown Copyright (C) 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - Lexical stress

KW - Stress assignment

KW - Probabilistic cues

KW - Statistical learning

KW - Orthography

KW - Reading

KW - Reading aloud

KW - Reading acquisition

KW - Reading development

KW - Visual word recognition

KW - SPELLING-SOUND CONSISTENCY

KW - VISUAL WORD RECOGNITION

KW - DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA

KW - LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT

KW - ORTHOGRAPHIC CUES

KW - ENGLISH

KW - MODEL

KW - SENSITIVITY

KW - CHILDREN

KW - GREEK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954213296&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jml.2010.03.005

DO - 10.1016/j.jml.2010.03.005

M3 - Journal article

VL - 63

SP - 180

EP - 196

JO - Journal of Memory and Language

JF - Journal of Memory and Language

SN - 0749-596X

IS - 2

ER -