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Local temperature and not latitude determines the design of Blue Tit and Great Tit nests

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Local temperature and not latitude determines the design of Blue Tit and Great Tit nests. / Deeming, D. Charles; Mainwaring, Mark C.; Hartley, Ian R.; Reynolds, S. James.

In: Avian Biology Research, Vol. 5, No. 4, 2012, p. 203-208.

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Deeming, D. Charles ; Mainwaring, Mark C. ; Hartley, Ian R. ; Reynolds, S. James. / Local temperature and not latitude determines the design of Blue Tit and Great Tit nests. In: Avian Biology Research. 2012 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 203-208.

Bibtex

@article{44be7a1cbee84aa4af2d958cdfa629ae,
title = "Local temperature and not latitude determines the design of Blue Tit and Great Tit nests",
abstract = "Recent studies are documenting the extent to which the mass and construction of bird nests varies between individuals and locations. In the Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) and Great Tit (Parus major), temperatures experienced by females during nest construction are inversely related to nest mass. Moreover, Mainwaring et al. (Journal of Biogeography, 2012) showed that nests constructed at high latitude are heavier and better insulated than nests built by conspecifics in the south. Although mean spring temperature was used as a proxy for latitude in the Mainwaring et al. study, it remains untested whether individual birds build nests in response to a narrower range of temperatures experienced at the start of the breeding season. Our study showed that irrespective of latitude nest mass, and in particular nest cup mass, of Blue Tits and Great Tits was significantly affected by the temperature experienced by the birds for the seven days preceding clutch initiation. Similar results were seen with the insulatory properties of nests. The potential impact of variation in nest construction and insulation on subsequent incubation and chick-rearing behaviour is discussed.",
keywords = "QUALITY, CONSTRUCTION, insulation quality, Cyanistes caeruleus, PARUS-MAJOR, Parus major, SWALLOWS TACHYCINETA-BICOLOR, INSULATION, FEMALE, nest design, spring temperature, REPRODUCTIVE-PERFORMANCE, latitude, breeding success, CYANISTES-CAERULEUS",
author = "Deeming, {D. Charles} and Mainwaring, {Mark C.} and Hartley, {Ian R.} and Reynolds, {S. James}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.3184/175815512X13528874959581",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "203--208",
journal = "Avian Biology Research",
issn = "1758-1559",
publisher = "Science and Technology Letters",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Local temperature and not latitude determines the design of Blue Tit and Great Tit nests

AU - Deeming, D. Charles

AU - Mainwaring, Mark C.

AU - Hartley, Ian R.

AU - Reynolds, S. James

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Recent studies are documenting the extent to which the mass and construction of bird nests varies between individuals and locations. In the Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) and Great Tit (Parus major), temperatures experienced by females during nest construction are inversely related to nest mass. Moreover, Mainwaring et al. (Journal of Biogeography, 2012) showed that nests constructed at high latitude are heavier and better insulated than nests built by conspecifics in the south. Although mean spring temperature was used as a proxy for latitude in the Mainwaring et al. study, it remains untested whether individual birds build nests in response to a narrower range of temperatures experienced at the start of the breeding season. Our study showed that irrespective of latitude nest mass, and in particular nest cup mass, of Blue Tits and Great Tits was significantly affected by the temperature experienced by the birds for the seven days preceding clutch initiation. Similar results were seen with the insulatory properties of nests. The potential impact of variation in nest construction and insulation on subsequent incubation and chick-rearing behaviour is discussed.

AB - Recent studies are documenting the extent to which the mass and construction of bird nests varies between individuals and locations. In the Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) and Great Tit (Parus major), temperatures experienced by females during nest construction are inversely related to nest mass. Moreover, Mainwaring et al. (Journal of Biogeography, 2012) showed that nests constructed at high latitude are heavier and better insulated than nests built by conspecifics in the south. Although mean spring temperature was used as a proxy for latitude in the Mainwaring et al. study, it remains untested whether individual birds build nests in response to a narrower range of temperatures experienced at the start of the breeding season. Our study showed that irrespective of latitude nest mass, and in particular nest cup mass, of Blue Tits and Great Tits was significantly affected by the temperature experienced by the birds for the seven days preceding clutch initiation. Similar results were seen with the insulatory properties of nests. The potential impact of variation in nest construction and insulation on subsequent incubation and chick-rearing behaviour is discussed.

KW - QUALITY

KW - CONSTRUCTION

KW - insulation quality

KW - Cyanistes caeruleus

KW - PARUS-MAJOR

KW - Parus major

KW - SWALLOWS TACHYCINETA-BICOLOR

KW - INSULATION

KW - FEMALE

KW - nest design

KW - spring temperature

KW - REPRODUCTIVE-PERFORMANCE

KW - latitude

KW - breeding success

KW - CYANISTES-CAERULEUS

U2 - 10.3184/175815512X13528874959581

DO - 10.3184/175815512X13528874959581

M3 - Journal article

VL - 5

SP - 203

EP - 208

JO - Avian Biology Research

JF - Avian Biology Research

SN - 1758-1559

IS - 4

ER -