Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admis...

Electronic data

  • Accepted_version_2018_05_14_Age_and_Ageing_Short_Report_Loneliness_Care_Homes

    Rights statement: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Age and Ageing following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated versionBarbara Hanratty, Daniel Stow, Danni Collingridge Moore, Nicole K Valtorta, Fiona Matthews, Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, Age and Ageing, Volume 47, Issue 6, November 2018, Pages 896–900, https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afy095 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/ageing/article/47/6/896/5051695

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.19 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. / Hanratty, Barbara; Stow, Daniel; Collingridge Moore, Danni; Valtorta, Nicole K; Matthews, Fiona.

In: Age and Ageing, Vol. 47, No. 6, 01.11.2018, p. 896-900.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Hanratty, B, Stow, D, Collingridge Moore, D, Valtorta, NK & Matthews, F 2018, 'Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing', Age and Ageing, vol. 47, no. 6, pp. 896-900. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afy095

APA

Vancouver

Author

Hanratty, Barbara ; Stow, Daniel ; Collingridge Moore, Danni ; Valtorta, Nicole K ; Matthews, Fiona. / Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. In: Age and Ageing. 2018 ; Vol. 47, No. 6. pp. 896-900.

Bibtex

@article{1dc84858dd2247c4bdba655df694c9ed,
title = "Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing",
abstract = "Background: loneliness has an adverse effect on health and well-being, and is common at older ages. Evidence that it is a risk factor for care home admission is sparse.Objective: to investigate the association between loneliness and care home admission.Setting: English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA).Participants: two-hundred fifty-four individuals across seven waves (2002-15) of ELSA who moved into care homes were age, sex matched to four randomly selected individuals who remained in the community.Methods: logistic regression models examined associations between loneliness, socio-demographic factors, functional status and health on moving into care homes.Results: loneliness (measured by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale and a single-item question from the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)) was associated with moving into a care home (CES-D OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.43-3.17, P = 0.0002, UCLA OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.01-3.27, P = 0.05). The association persisted after adjusting for established predictors (age, sex, social isolation, depression, memory problems including diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, disability, long-term physical health and wealth). The impact of loneliness (measured by CES-D) on admission accounted for a population attributable fraction of 19.9% (95% CI 7.8-30.4%).Conclusions: loneliness conveys an independent risk of care home admission that, unlike other risk factors, may be amenable to modification. Tackling loneliness amongst older adults may be a way of enhancing wellbeing and delaying or reducing the demand for institutional care.",
author = "Barbara Hanratty and Daniel Stow and {Collingridge Moore}, Danni and Valtorta, {Nicole K} and Fiona Matthews",
note = "This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Age and Ageing following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated versionBarbara Hanratty, Daniel Stow, Danni Collingridge Moore, Nicole K Valtorta, Fiona Matthews, Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, Age and Ageing, Volume 47, Issue 6, November 2018, Pages 896–900, https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afy095 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/ageing/article/47/6/896/5051695 ",
year = "2018",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/ageing/afy095",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "896--900",
journal = "Age and Ageing",
issn = "0002-0729",
publisher = "OXFORD UNIV PRESS",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

AU - Hanratty, Barbara

AU - Stow, Daniel

AU - Collingridge Moore, Danni

AU - Valtorta, Nicole K

AU - Matthews, Fiona

N1 - This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Age and Ageing following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated versionBarbara Hanratty, Daniel Stow, Danni Collingridge Moore, Nicole K Valtorta, Fiona Matthews, Loneliness as a risk factor for care home admission in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, Age and Ageing, Volume 47, Issue 6, November 2018, Pages 896–900, https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afy095 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/ageing/article/47/6/896/5051695

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Background: loneliness has an adverse effect on health and well-being, and is common at older ages. Evidence that it is a risk factor for care home admission is sparse.Objective: to investigate the association between loneliness and care home admission.Setting: English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA).Participants: two-hundred fifty-four individuals across seven waves (2002-15) of ELSA who moved into care homes were age, sex matched to four randomly selected individuals who remained in the community.Methods: logistic regression models examined associations between loneliness, socio-demographic factors, functional status and health on moving into care homes.Results: loneliness (measured by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale and a single-item question from the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)) was associated with moving into a care home (CES-D OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.43-3.17, P = 0.0002, UCLA OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.01-3.27, P = 0.05). The association persisted after adjusting for established predictors (age, sex, social isolation, depression, memory problems including diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, disability, long-term physical health and wealth). The impact of loneliness (measured by CES-D) on admission accounted for a population attributable fraction of 19.9% (95% CI 7.8-30.4%).Conclusions: loneliness conveys an independent risk of care home admission that, unlike other risk factors, may be amenable to modification. Tackling loneliness amongst older adults may be a way of enhancing wellbeing and delaying or reducing the demand for institutional care.

AB - Background: loneliness has an adverse effect on health and well-being, and is common at older ages. Evidence that it is a risk factor for care home admission is sparse.Objective: to investigate the association between loneliness and care home admission.Setting: English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA).Participants: two-hundred fifty-four individuals across seven waves (2002-15) of ELSA who moved into care homes were age, sex matched to four randomly selected individuals who remained in the community.Methods: logistic regression models examined associations between loneliness, socio-demographic factors, functional status and health on moving into care homes.Results: loneliness (measured by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale and a single-item question from the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)) was associated with moving into a care home (CES-D OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.43-3.17, P = 0.0002, UCLA OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.01-3.27, P = 0.05). The association persisted after adjusting for established predictors (age, sex, social isolation, depression, memory problems including diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, disability, long-term physical health and wealth). The impact of loneliness (measured by CES-D) on admission accounted for a population attributable fraction of 19.9% (95% CI 7.8-30.4%).Conclusions: loneliness conveys an independent risk of care home admission that, unlike other risk factors, may be amenable to modification. Tackling loneliness amongst older adults may be a way of enhancing wellbeing and delaying or reducing the demand for institutional care.

U2 - 10.1093/ageing/afy095

DO - 10.1093/ageing/afy095

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30007359

VL - 47

SP - 896

EP - 900

JO - Age and Ageing

JF - Age and Ageing

SN - 0002-0729

IS - 6

ER -