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  • Market Driving at Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP)

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 86, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.07.001

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Market driving at Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP): An analysis of social enterprises from the healthcare sector

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>05/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Business Research
Volume86
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)234-244
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date13/07/17
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

To date, scholarly understanding of external dimensions of market driving for the purposes of ‘societal change’ is largely unexplored in both developed and emerging market contexts. This paper uses a multiple case study approach to understand how market driving social enterprises (across the hybrid spectrum) create societal change in emerging markets. By drawing on Scott's (1995) three-part conceptualization of institutional legitimacy, this study explores how regulative, normative and cognitive legitimacies are invoked by market driving social enterprises at the Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP). Key contributions of the study show that all three dimensions of legitimacy are relevant but they need to be invoked in a specific order based on necessary and optional conditions. An implication of the study is that market driving through societal change can lead to the construction of new and more inclusive healthcare markets.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 86, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.07.001