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Micropits on volcanic glass shards: Laboratory simulation and possible origin

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Micropits on volcanic glass shards : Laboratory simulation and possible origin. / Huang, T. C.; Varner, J. R.; Wilson, L.

In: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.08.1980, p. 59-68.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Huang, TC, Varner, JR & Wilson, L 1980, 'Micropits on volcanic glass shards: Laboratory simulation and possible origin', Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 59-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/0377-0273(80)90007-4

APA

Huang, T. C., Varner, J. R., & Wilson, L. (1980). Micropits on volcanic glass shards: Laboratory simulation and possible origin. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 8(1), 59-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/0377-0273(80)90007-4

Vancouver

Huang TC, Varner JR, Wilson L. Micropits on volcanic glass shards: Laboratory simulation and possible origin. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 1980 Aug 1;8(1):59-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/0377-0273(80)90007-4

Author

Huang, T. C. ; Varner, J. R. ; Wilson, L. / Micropits on volcanic glass shards : Laboratory simulation and possible origin. In: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 1980 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 59-68.

Bibtex

@article{a474970a733a48a2ad083cf8d3543132,
title = "Micropits on volcanic glass shards: Laboratory simulation and possible origin",
abstract = "Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized pits are dominant features on volcanic glass shards derived from explosive eruptions and deposited in many deep-sea sediments and subaerial tuffs. The morphology of these pits and experimentally simulated pits and calculations of pressure fluctuations during or just after fragmentation in a magma chamber suggest the pits were formed by collision of volcanic particles, probably in the conduit system. The range of velocities calculated for the particles from the fragmentation of a magma clot, from a few tens up to 120 m/s, is very similar to the range found from the experimental results, 25–140 m/s. A collision with excess energy may reduce the particle size in a secondary fragmentation.",
author = "Huang, {T. C.} and Varner, {J. R.} and L. Wilson",
year = "1980",
month = aug,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0377-0273(80)90007-4",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "59--68",
journal = "Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research",
issn = "0377-0273",
publisher = "Elsevier Science B.V.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Micropits on volcanic glass shards

T2 - Laboratory simulation and possible origin

AU - Huang, T. C.

AU - Varner, J. R.

AU - Wilson, L.

PY - 1980/8/1

Y1 - 1980/8/1

N2 - Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized pits are dominant features on volcanic glass shards derived from explosive eruptions and deposited in many deep-sea sediments and subaerial tuffs. The morphology of these pits and experimentally simulated pits and calculations of pressure fluctuations during or just after fragmentation in a magma chamber suggest the pits were formed by collision of volcanic particles, probably in the conduit system. The range of velocities calculated for the particles from the fragmentation of a magma clot, from a few tens up to 120 m/s, is very similar to the range found from the experimental results, 25–140 m/s. A collision with excess energy may reduce the particle size in a secondary fragmentation.

AB - Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized pits are dominant features on volcanic glass shards derived from explosive eruptions and deposited in many deep-sea sediments and subaerial tuffs. The morphology of these pits and experimentally simulated pits and calculations of pressure fluctuations during or just after fragmentation in a magma chamber suggest the pits were formed by collision of volcanic particles, probably in the conduit system. The range of velocities calculated for the particles from the fragmentation of a magma clot, from a few tens up to 120 m/s, is very similar to the range found from the experimental results, 25–140 m/s. A collision with excess energy may reduce the particle size in a secondary fragmentation.

U2 - 10.1016/0377-0273(80)90007-4

DO - 10.1016/0377-0273(80)90007-4

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:84995014213

VL - 8

SP - 59

EP - 68

JO - Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

JF - Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

SN - 0377-0273

IS - 1

ER -