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  • 04_Nativisation South African English IJBEB_final

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism on 29/05/2015, available online:http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13670050.2015.1027141

    Accepted author manuscript, 264 KB, Word document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

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Motion event categorisation in a nativised variety of South African English

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>2015
<mark>Journal</mark>International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism
Issue number5
Volume18
Number of pages14
Pages (from-to)588-601
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date29/05/15
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The present study seeks to expand the current focus on acquisition situations in linguistic relativity research by exploring the effects of nativisation (the process by which a L2 is acquired as a L1) on language-specific cognitive behaviour. Categorisation preferences of goal-oriented motion events were investigated in South African speakers who learnt English as a L1 from caregivers who spoke English as a L2 and Afrikaans as a L1. The aim of the study was to establish whether the categorisation patterns found in the nativised English variety: (1) resemble patterns of L2 speakers of English with Afrikaans as a L1, (2) resemble patterns of L1 English speakers of a non-nativised English variety and (3) do not pattern with either of the above, but instead exhibit a distinct behaviour. It was found that simultaneous, functional bilinguals (Afrikaans and nativised English) patterned with L1 Afrikaans speakers, but the extent to which they did so was modulated by their frequency of use of Afrikaans. Functionally monolingual speakers of nativised English, on the other hand, patterned with L1 speakers of British English. This suggests that bilingualism, rather than nativisation, was a reliable predictor of event categorisation preferences.

Bibliographic note

Date of Acceptance: 06/03/2015 This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism on 29/05/2015, available online:http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13670050.2015.1027141