Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Mowing mitigates the negative impacts of N addi...

Electronic data

  • newygj_Manuscript_minor_revision_lxt_CJS1

    Rights statement: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-019-04353-9

    Accepted author manuscript, 927 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Mowing mitigates the negative impacts of N addition on plant species diversity

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
  • G.-J. Yang
  • X.-T. Lü
  • C.J. Stevens
  • G.-M. Zhang
  • H.-Y. Wang
  • Z.-W. Wang
  • Z.-J. Zhang
  • Z.-Y. Liu
  • X.-G. Han
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/03/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Oecologia
Issue number3
Volume189
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)769-779
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date6/02/19
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Increasing availability of reactive nitrogen (N) threatens plant diversity in diverse ecosystems. While there is mounting evidence for the negative impacts of N deposition on one component of diversity, species richness, we know little about its effects on another one, species evenness. It is suspected that ecosystem management practice that removes nitrogen from the ecosystem, such as hay-harvesting by mowing in grasslands, would mitigate the negative impacts of N deposition on plant diversity. However, empirical evidence is scarce. Here, we reported the main and interactive effects of N deposition and mowing on plant diversity in a temperate meadow steppe with 4-year data from a field experiment within which multi-level N addition rates and multiple N compounds are considered. Across all the types of N compounds, species richness and evenness significantly decreased with the increases of N addition rate, which was mainly caused by the growth of a tall rhizomatous grass, Leymus chinensis. Such negative impacts of N addition were accumulating with time. Mowing significantly reduced the dominance of L. chinensis, and mitigated the negative impacts of N deposition on species evenness. We present robust evidence that N deposition threatened biodiversity by reducing both species richness and evenness, a process which could be alleviated by mowing. Our results highlight the changes of species evenness in driving the negative impacts of N deposition on plant diversity and the role of mowing in mediating such negative impacts of N deposition.

Bibliographic note

The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-019-04353-9