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New insights into the developmental biology and transmission mechanisms of Leishmania

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New insights into the developmental biology and transmission mechanisms of Leishmania. / Bates, P A; Rogers, M E.

In: Current Molecular Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 6, 2004, p. 601-609.

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Bates, P A ; Rogers, M E. / New insights into the developmental biology and transmission mechanisms of Leishmania. In: Current Molecular Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 4, No. 6. pp. 601-609.

Bibtex

@article{a9ad1eb5d77e499d97dc7a9d94e57b59,
title = "New insights into the developmental biology and transmission mechanisms of Leishmania",
abstract = "Leishmania alternates between two main morphological forms in its life cycle: intracellular amastigotes in the mammalian host and motile promastigotes in the sandfly vector. Several different forms of promastigote can be recognised in sandfly infections. The first promastigote forms, which are found in the sandfly in the bloodmeal phase, are multiplicative procyclic promastigotes. These differentiate into nectomonad promastigotes, which are a non-dividing migratory stage moving from the posterior to the anterior midgut. When nectomonad promastigotes arrive at the anterior midgut they differentiate into leptomonad forms, a newly named life cycle stage, which resume replication. Leptomonad promastigotes, which are found in the anterior midgut, are the developmental precursors of the metacyclic promastigotes, the mammal-infective stages. Leptomonad forms also produce promastigote secretory gel, a substance that plays a key role in transmission by forming a physical obstruction in the gut, forcing the sandfly to regurgitate metacyclic promastigotes during bloodfeeding.",
author = "Bates, {P A} and Rogers, {M E}",
year = "2004",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "601--609",
journal = "Current Molecular Medicine",
issn = "1566-5240",
publisher = "Bentham Science Publishers B.V.",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - New insights into the developmental biology and transmission mechanisms of Leishmania

AU - Bates, P A

AU - Rogers, M E

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Leishmania alternates between two main morphological forms in its life cycle: intracellular amastigotes in the mammalian host and motile promastigotes in the sandfly vector. Several different forms of promastigote can be recognised in sandfly infections. The first promastigote forms, which are found in the sandfly in the bloodmeal phase, are multiplicative procyclic promastigotes. These differentiate into nectomonad promastigotes, which are a non-dividing migratory stage moving from the posterior to the anterior midgut. When nectomonad promastigotes arrive at the anterior midgut they differentiate into leptomonad forms, a newly named life cycle stage, which resume replication. Leptomonad promastigotes, which are found in the anterior midgut, are the developmental precursors of the metacyclic promastigotes, the mammal-infective stages. Leptomonad forms also produce promastigote secretory gel, a substance that plays a key role in transmission by forming a physical obstruction in the gut, forcing the sandfly to regurgitate metacyclic promastigotes during bloodfeeding.

AB - Leishmania alternates between two main morphological forms in its life cycle: intracellular amastigotes in the mammalian host and motile promastigotes in the sandfly vector. Several different forms of promastigote can be recognised in sandfly infections. The first promastigote forms, which are found in the sandfly in the bloodmeal phase, are multiplicative procyclic promastigotes. These differentiate into nectomonad promastigotes, which are a non-dividing migratory stage moving from the posterior to the anterior midgut. When nectomonad promastigotes arrive at the anterior midgut they differentiate into leptomonad forms, a newly named life cycle stage, which resume replication. Leptomonad promastigotes, which are found in the anterior midgut, are the developmental precursors of the metacyclic promastigotes, the mammal-infective stages. Leptomonad forms also produce promastigote secretory gel, a substance that plays a key role in transmission by forming a physical obstruction in the gut, forcing the sandfly to regurgitate metacyclic promastigotes during bloodfeeding.

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 15357211

VL - 4

SP - 601

EP - 609

JO - Current Molecular Medicine

JF - Current Molecular Medicine

SN - 1566-5240

IS - 6

ER -