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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Third World Quarterly on 06/06/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01436597.2016.1176859

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‘New’ nations: resource-based development imaginaries in Ghana and Ecuador

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‘New’ nations : resource-based development imaginaries in Ghana and Ecuador. / Childs, John Robert; Hearn, Julie Francoise.

In: Third World Quarterly, Vol. 38, No. 4, 04.2017, p. 844-861.

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@article{0f27252b2160413c901d196036ba0ad0,
title = "{\textquoteleft}New{\textquoteright} nations: resource-based development imaginaries in Ghana and Ecuador",
abstract = "Recently there have been increasing instances of the return of the state as the central agent of development in resource-rich nations globally. Characterised by both a rhetorical and substantive commitment to increasing control over national resource revenues, this so-called new/neo-extractivism has attracted a debate concerning the extent to which it offers a viable alternative to the imperatives of neoliberal resource extraction. Using two examples, this paper analyses the ways in which the Ghanaian and Ecuadorean states discursively imagine such structural transformations. It highlights the value in analysing the politics of language for strengthening studies of neo-extractivism.",
keywords = "resource politics, neo-extractivism, development, imaginaries, Ghana, Educador",
author = "Childs, {John Robert} and Hearn, {Julie Francoise}",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Third World Quarterly on 06/06/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01436597.2016.1176859",
year = "2017",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1080/01436597.2016.1176859",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "844--861",
journal = "Third World Quarterly",
issn = "0143-6597",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘New’ nations

T2 - resource-based development imaginaries in Ghana and Ecuador

AU - Childs, John Robert

AU - Hearn, Julie Francoise

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Third World Quarterly on 06/06/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01436597.2016.1176859

PY - 2017/4

Y1 - 2017/4

N2 - Recently there have been increasing instances of the return of the state as the central agent of development in resource-rich nations globally. Characterised by both a rhetorical and substantive commitment to increasing control over national resource revenues, this so-called new/neo-extractivism has attracted a debate concerning the extent to which it offers a viable alternative to the imperatives of neoliberal resource extraction. Using two examples, this paper analyses the ways in which the Ghanaian and Ecuadorean states discursively imagine such structural transformations. It highlights the value in analysing the politics of language for strengthening studies of neo-extractivism.

AB - Recently there have been increasing instances of the return of the state as the central agent of development in resource-rich nations globally. Characterised by both a rhetorical and substantive commitment to increasing control over national resource revenues, this so-called new/neo-extractivism has attracted a debate concerning the extent to which it offers a viable alternative to the imperatives of neoliberal resource extraction. Using two examples, this paper analyses the ways in which the Ghanaian and Ecuadorean states discursively imagine such structural transformations. It highlights the value in analysing the politics of language for strengthening studies of neo-extractivism.

KW - resource politics

KW - neo-extractivism

KW - development

KW - imaginaries

KW - Ghana

KW - Educador

U2 - 10.1080/01436597.2016.1176859

DO - 10.1080/01436597.2016.1176859

M3 - Journal article

VL - 38

SP - 844

EP - 861

JO - Third World Quarterly

JF - Third World Quarterly

SN - 0143-6597

IS - 4

ER -