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  • N_dep_NutNet_TREE_review_FINAL_R1_1_

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Trends in Ecology and Evolution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 37, 6, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2022.02.013

    Accepted author manuscript, 512 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 12/04/23

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Nitrogen deposition and climate: an integrated synthesis

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/05/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Trends in Ecology and Evolution
Issue number6
Volume37
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)541-552
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date12/04/22
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Human activities have more than doubled reactive nitrogen (N) deposited in ecosystems, perturbing the N cycle and considerably impacting plant, animal, and microbial communities. However, biotic responses to N deposition can vary widely depending on factors including local climate and soils, limiting our ability to predict ecosystem responses. Here, we synthesize reported impacts of elevated N on grasslands and draw upon evidence from the globally distributed Nutrient Network experiment (NutNet) to provide insight into causes of variation and their relative importance across scales. This synthesis highlights that climate and elevated N frequently interact, modifying biotic responses to N. It also demonstrates the importance of edaphic context and widespread interactions with other limiting nutrients in controlling biotic responses to N deposition.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Trends in Ecology and Evolution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 37, 6, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2022.02.013