Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Organic electronic materials for gene delivery
View graph of relations

Organic electronic materials for gene delivery

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNChapter

Published

Standard

Organic electronic materials for gene delivery. / Hardy, John George.

Engineering of nanobiomaterials: Applications of nanobiomaterials. ed. / Alexandru Grumezescu. Elsevier, 2016. p. 119-144.

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNChapter

Harvard

Hardy, JG 2016, Organic electronic materials for gene delivery. in A Grumezescu (ed.), Engineering of nanobiomaterials: Applications of nanobiomaterials. Elsevier, pp. 119-144.

APA

Hardy, J. G. (2016). Organic electronic materials for gene delivery. In A. Grumezescu (Ed.), Engineering of nanobiomaterials: Applications of nanobiomaterials (pp. 119-144). Elsevier.

Vancouver

Hardy JG. Organic electronic materials for gene delivery. In Grumezescu A, editor, Engineering of nanobiomaterials: Applications of nanobiomaterials. Elsevier. 2016. p. 119-144

Author

Hardy, John George. / Organic electronic materials for gene delivery. Engineering of nanobiomaterials: Applications of nanobiomaterials. editor / Alexandru Grumezescu. Elsevier, 2016. pp. 119-144

Bibtex

@inbook{4a6822be71ff43b3ae0280a5db8a2607,
title = "Organic electronic materials for gene delivery",
abstract = "Gene therapy has the potential to treat various diseases by altering levels of protein expression, or correcting genetic mutations. A prerequisite of effective gene is the delivery of polynucleic acids (e.g., DNA, RNA) to a patient{\textquoteright}s cells which can be achieved by a variety of means, including technological (e.g., electroporation), viruses (which are nature{\textquoteright}s gene delivery vectors) or non-viral vectors (e.g., lipids, nanoparticles, polymers). The focus of this chapter is the use of organic electronic materials (i.e., fullerenes, graphenes and conjugated polymers) as non-viral gene delivery vectors and their potential for application as novel theranostic devices. These represent an exciting new class of non-viral vectors that are at the frontier of novel approaches towards gene therapy.",
keywords = "gene delivery, organic electronics, conducting polymers, conjugated polymers, fullerenes, bucky balls, Nanotubes, graphene",
author = "Hardy, {John George}",
year = "2016",
month = jan,
day = "13",
language = "English",
pages = "119--144",
editor = "Alexandru Grumezescu",
booktitle = "Engineering of nanobiomaterials",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Organic electronic materials for gene delivery

AU - Hardy, John George

PY - 2016/1/13

Y1 - 2016/1/13

N2 - Gene therapy has the potential to treat various diseases by altering levels of protein expression, or correcting genetic mutations. A prerequisite of effective gene is the delivery of polynucleic acids (e.g., DNA, RNA) to a patient’s cells which can be achieved by a variety of means, including technological (e.g., electroporation), viruses (which are nature’s gene delivery vectors) or non-viral vectors (e.g., lipids, nanoparticles, polymers). The focus of this chapter is the use of organic electronic materials (i.e., fullerenes, graphenes and conjugated polymers) as non-viral gene delivery vectors and their potential for application as novel theranostic devices. These represent an exciting new class of non-viral vectors that are at the frontier of novel approaches towards gene therapy.

AB - Gene therapy has the potential to treat various diseases by altering levels of protein expression, or correcting genetic mutations. A prerequisite of effective gene is the delivery of polynucleic acids (e.g., DNA, RNA) to a patient’s cells which can be achieved by a variety of means, including technological (e.g., electroporation), viruses (which are nature’s gene delivery vectors) or non-viral vectors (e.g., lipids, nanoparticles, polymers). The focus of this chapter is the use of organic electronic materials (i.e., fullerenes, graphenes and conjugated polymers) as non-viral gene delivery vectors and their potential for application as novel theranostic devices. These represent an exciting new class of non-viral vectors that are at the frontier of novel approaches towards gene therapy.

KW - gene delivery

KW - organic electronics

KW - conducting polymers

KW - conjugated polymers

KW - fullerenes

KW - bucky balls

KW - Nanotubes

KW - graphene

M3 - Chapter

SP - 119

EP - 144

BT - Engineering of nanobiomaterials

A2 - Grumezescu, Alexandru

PB - Elsevier

ER -