Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Patterns of decline in numbers of learning disa...
View graph of relations

Patterns of decline in numbers of learning disability nurses employed by the English National Health Service

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Published

Standard

Patterns of decline in numbers of learning disability nurses employed by the English National Health Service. / Glover, Gyles; Emerson, Eric.

In: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Vol. 17, No. 4, 2012, p. 194-198.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Glover, Gyles ; Emerson, Eric. / Patterns of decline in numbers of learning disability nurses employed by the English National Health Service. In: Tizard Learning Disability Review. 2012 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 194-198.

Bibtex

@misc{65007af90a6d4524ac051ab31dc06b40,
title = "Patterns of decline in numbers of learning disability nurses employed by the English National Health Service",
abstract = "Purpose – To report on trends in the number of learning disability nurses working in the English National Health Service (NHS).Design/methodology/approach – The paper provides secondary analysis of data from NHS workforce statistics.Findings – Over the period 2008 to 2011, there was a decline of 23 per cent in the number of whole time equivalent learning disability nurses employed by the NHS. While the decline may, in part, be explained by a parallel reduction in NHS inpatient beds for people with learning disabilities, unevenly distributed reductions in the number of community nurses in different English regions are harder to explain.Research limitations/implications – A better understanding of the numbers of learning disability nurses working in different sectors, given the roles expected of them, is essential to workforce planning and training plans.Originality/value – Learning disability nurses are crucial to modern community based learning disability services. In this context, the number and distribution of them is important.",
keywords = "Learning disabilities, Learning disability nursing , Nurses, Social care , Workforce planning",
author = "Gyles Glover and Eric Emerson",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1108/13595471211272541",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "194--198",
journal = "Tizard Learning Disability Review",
issn = "1359-5474",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Patterns of decline in numbers of learning disability nurses employed by the English National Health Service

AU - Glover, Gyles

AU - Emerson, Eric

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Purpose – To report on trends in the number of learning disability nurses working in the English National Health Service (NHS).Design/methodology/approach – The paper provides secondary analysis of data from NHS workforce statistics.Findings – Over the period 2008 to 2011, there was a decline of 23 per cent in the number of whole time equivalent learning disability nurses employed by the NHS. While the decline may, in part, be explained by a parallel reduction in NHS inpatient beds for people with learning disabilities, unevenly distributed reductions in the number of community nurses in different English regions are harder to explain.Research limitations/implications – A better understanding of the numbers of learning disability nurses working in different sectors, given the roles expected of them, is essential to workforce planning and training plans.Originality/value – Learning disability nurses are crucial to modern community based learning disability services. In this context, the number and distribution of them is important.

AB - Purpose – To report on trends in the number of learning disability nurses working in the English National Health Service (NHS).Design/methodology/approach – The paper provides secondary analysis of data from NHS workforce statistics.Findings – Over the period 2008 to 2011, there was a decline of 23 per cent in the number of whole time equivalent learning disability nurses employed by the NHS. While the decline may, in part, be explained by a parallel reduction in NHS inpatient beds for people with learning disabilities, unevenly distributed reductions in the number of community nurses in different English regions are harder to explain.Research limitations/implications – A better understanding of the numbers of learning disability nurses working in different sectors, given the roles expected of them, is essential to workforce planning and training plans.Originality/value – Learning disability nurses are crucial to modern community based learning disability services. In this context, the number and distribution of them is important.

KW - Learning disabilities

KW - Learning disability nursing

KW - Nurses

KW - Social care

KW - Workforce planning

U2 - 10.1108/13595471211272541

DO - 10.1108/13595471211272541

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 194

EP - 198

JO - Tizard Learning Disability Review

JF - Tizard Learning Disability Review

SN - 1359-5474

ER -