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  • Accepted manuscript Alcohol Alcoholism

    Rights statement: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Alcohol and Alcoholism following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Rebecca L Monk, Adam W Qureshi, Adam McNeill, Marianne Erskine-Shaw, Derek Heim; Perfect for a Gin and Tonic: How Context Drives Consumption Within a Modified Bogus Taste Test, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 53, Issue 3, 1 May 2018, Pages 228–234, https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agx084 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/alcalc/article/53/3/228/4608041

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Perfect for a Gin and Tonic: How Context Drives Consumption Within a Modified Bogus Taste Test

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/05/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Alcohol and Alcoholism
Issue number3
Volume53
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)228-234
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date9/11/17
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Aim
To implement a modified bogus taste test (BTT) and to examine the interactive effects of environmental and social contexts on levels of ‘alcohol’ consumption.

Method
University students (Study 1 n = 38, Study 2 n = 80), recruited via opportunity sampling, completed a modified BTT under the pretence of assessing garnish preference for gin and tonic. All participants were tested alone or as part of an existing friendship group. In Study 1 participants were in a laboratory setting but were exposed to different contextual cues (alcohol-related or neutral) by way of posters displayed on the walls. In Study 2, participants assessed the drinks in either a pub or a library setting.

Results
In Study 1 participants tested in a group consumed significantly more when exposed to pub-related stimuli in contrast to those who were exposed to library-related stimuli. Participants who were alone and exposed to library-related cues consumed significantly more than those in a group and exposed to these cues. In Study 2, as in Study 1, participants tested in a group condition consumed significantly more of what they believed to be alcohol when in the pub compared to those who were tested in the library. Higher group consumption was also evident in the library condition, although the size of this difference was not as large as in the pub testing condition.

Conclusion
In the absence of any pharmacological effects of alcohol, social and environmental context have an interactive impact on shaping consumption.

Bibliographic note

This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Alcohol and Alcoholism following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Rebecca L Monk, Adam W Qureshi, Adam McNeill, Marianne Erskine-Shaw, Derek Heim; Perfect for a Gin and Tonic: How Context Drives Consumption Within a Modified Bogus Taste Test, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 53, Issue 3, 1 May 2018, Pages 228–234, https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agx084 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/alcalc/article/53/3/228/4608041