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Plant effects on soil N mineralization are mediated by the composition of multiple soil organic fractions

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Plant effects on soil N mineralization are mediated by the composition of multiple soil organic fractions. / Fornara, Dario A.; Bardgett, Richard; Steinbeiss, Sibylle et al.

In: Ecological Research, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 201-208.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Fornara, DA, Bardgett, R, Steinbeiss, S, Zak, DR, Gleixner, G & Tilman, D 2011, 'Plant effects on soil N mineralization are mediated by the composition of multiple soil organic fractions', Ecological Research, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 201-208. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11284-010-0777-0

APA

Fornara, D. A., Bardgett, R., Steinbeiss, S., Zak, D. R., Gleixner, G., & Tilman, D. (2011). Plant effects on soil N mineralization are mediated by the composition of multiple soil organic fractions. Ecological Research, 26(1), 201-208. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11284-010-0777-0

Vancouver

Fornara DA, Bardgett R, Steinbeiss S, Zak DR, Gleixner G, Tilman D. Plant effects on soil N mineralization are mediated by the composition of multiple soil organic fractions. Ecological Research. 2011 Jan;26(1):201-208. doi: 10.1007/s11284-010-0777-0

Author

Fornara, Dario A. ; Bardgett, Richard ; Steinbeiss, Sibylle et al. / Plant effects on soil N mineralization are mediated by the composition of multiple soil organic fractions. In: Ecological Research. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 201-208.

Bibtex

@article{39f98f99e439490bb1567726a97090fa,
title = "Plant effects on soil N mineralization are mediated by the composition of multiple soil organic fractions",
abstract = "Despite the topic of soil nitrogen (N) mineralization being well-studied, very few studies have addressed the relative contribution of different plant and soil variables in influencing soil N mineralization rates, and thus the supply of inorganic N to plants. Here, we used data from a well-studied N-limited grassland to address the relative effects of six plant and soil variables on net and on gross rates of soil N mineralization. We also addressed whether plant effects on soil N mineralization were mediated by changes in C and N concentrations of multiple soil organic matter (SOM) fractions. Regression analyses show that key plant traits (i.e., plant C:N ratios and total root mass) were more important than total C and N concentrations of bulk soil in influencing N mineralization. This was mainly because plant traits influenced the C and N concentration (and C:N ratios) of different SOM fractions, which in turn were significantly associated with changes in net and gross N mineralization. In particular, C:N ratios of a labile soil fraction were negatively related to net soil N mineralization rates, whereas total soil C and N concentrations of more recalcitrant fractions were positively related to gross N mineralization. Our study suggests that changes in belowground N-cycling can be better predicted by simultaneously addressing how plant C:N ratios and root mass affect the composition and distribution of different SOM pools in N-limited grassland systems.",
author = "Fornara, {Dario A.} and Richard Bardgett and Sibylle Steinbeiss and Zak, {Donald R.} and Gerd Gleixner and David Tilman",
year = "2011",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1007/s11284-010-0777-0",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "201--208",
journal = "Ecological Research",
issn = "0912-3814",
publisher = "Springer Japan",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plant effects on soil N mineralization are mediated by the composition of multiple soil organic fractions

AU - Fornara, Dario A.

AU - Bardgett, Richard

AU - Steinbeiss, Sibylle

AU - Zak, Donald R.

AU - Gleixner, Gerd

AU - Tilman, David

PY - 2011/1

Y1 - 2011/1

N2 - Despite the topic of soil nitrogen (N) mineralization being well-studied, very few studies have addressed the relative contribution of different plant and soil variables in influencing soil N mineralization rates, and thus the supply of inorganic N to plants. Here, we used data from a well-studied N-limited grassland to address the relative effects of six plant and soil variables on net and on gross rates of soil N mineralization. We also addressed whether plant effects on soil N mineralization were mediated by changes in C and N concentrations of multiple soil organic matter (SOM) fractions. Regression analyses show that key plant traits (i.e., plant C:N ratios and total root mass) were more important than total C and N concentrations of bulk soil in influencing N mineralization. This was mainly because plant traits influenced the C and N concentration (and C:N ratios) of different SOM fractions, which in turn were significantly associated with changes in net and gross N mineralization. In particular, C:N ratios of a labile soil fraction were negatively related to net soil N mineralization rates, whereas total soil C and N concentrations of more recalcitrant fractions were positively related to gross N mineralization. Our study suggests that changes in belowground N-cycling can be better predicted by simultaneously addressing how plant C:N ratios and root mass affect the composition and distribution of different SOM pools in N-limited grassland systems.

AB - Despite the topic of soil nitrogen (N) mineralization being well-studied, very few studies have addressed the relative contribution of different plant and soil variables in influencing soil N mineralization rates, and thus the supply of inorganic N to plants. Here, we used data from a well-studied N-limited grassland to address the relative effects of six plant and soil variables on net and on gross rates of soil N mineralization. We also addressed whether plant effects on soil N mineralization were mediated by changes in C and N concentrations of multiple soil organic matter (SOM) fractions. Regression analyses show that key plant traits (i.e., plant C:N ratios and total root mass) were more important than total C and N concentrations of bulk soil in influencing N mineralization. This was mainly because plant traits influenced the C and N concentration (and C:N ratios) of different SOM fractions, which in turn were significantly associated with changes in net and gross N mineralization. In particular, C:N ratios of a labile soil fraction were negatively related to net soil N mineralization rates, whereas total soil C and N concentrations of more recalcitrant fractions were positively related to gross N mineralization. Our study suggests that changes in belowground N-cycling can be better predicted by simultaneously addressing how plant C:N ratios and root mass affect the composition and distribution of different SOM pools in N-limited grassland systems.

U2 - 10.1007/s11284-010-0777-0

DO - 10.1007/s11284-010-0777-0

M3 - Journal article

VL - 26

SP - 201

EP - 208

JO - Ecological Research

JF - Ecological Research

SN - 0912-3814

IS - 1

ER -