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Potential for Zika virus transmission by mosquitoes in temperate climates

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Potential for Zika virus transmission by mosquitoes in temperate climates. / Blagrove, M.S.C.; Caminade, C.; Diggle, P.J.; Patterson, E.I.; Sherlock, K.; Chapman, G.E.; Hesson, J.; Metelmann, S.; McCall, P.J.; Lycett, G.; Medlock, J.; Hughes, G.L.; Della Torre, A.; Baylis, M.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 287, No. 1930, 20200119, 08.07.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Blagrove, MSC, Caminade, C, Diggle, PJ, Patterson, EI, Sherlock, K, Chapman, GE, Hesson, J, Metelmann, S, McCall, PJ, Lycett, G, Medlock, J, Hughes, GL, Della Torre, A & Baylis, M 2020, 'Potential for Zika virus transmission by mosquitoes in temperate climates', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 287, no. 1930, 20200119. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.0119

APA

Blagrove, M. S. C., Caminade, C., Diggle, P. J., Patterson, E. I., Sherlock, K., Chapman, G. E., Hesson, J., Metelmann, S., McCall, P. J., Lycett, G., Medlock, J., Hughes, G. L., Della Torre, A., & Baylis, M. (2020). Potential for Zika virus transmission by mosquitoes in temperate climates. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 287(1930), [20200119]. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.0119

Vancouver

Blagrove MSC, Caminade C, Diggle PJ, Patterson EI, Sherlock K, Chapman GE et al. Potential for Zika virus transmission by mosquitoes in temperate climates. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2020 Jul 8;287(1930). 20200119. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.0119

Author

Blagrove, M.S.C. ; Caminade, C. ; Diggle, P.J. ; Patterson, E.I. ; Sherlock, K. ; Chapman, G.E. ; Hesson, J. ; Metelmann, S. ; McCall, P.J. ; Lycett, G. ; Medlock, J. ; Hughes, G.L. ; Della Torre, A. ; Baylis, M. / Potential for Zika virus transmission by mosquitoes in temperate climates. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2020 ; Vol. 287, No. 1930.

Bibtex

@article{fc04c1d686894c7fadfc625c61670382,
title = "Potential for Zika virus transmission by mosquitoes in temperate climates",
abstract = "Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) transmission has almost exclusively been detected in the tropics despite the distributions of its primary vectors extending farther into temperate regions. Therefore, it is unknown whether ZIKV's range has reached a temperature-dependent limit, or if it can spread into temperate climates. Using field-collected mosquitoes for biological relevance, we found that two common temperate mosquito species, Aedes albopictus and Ochlerotatus detritus, were competent for ZIKV. We orally exposed mosquitoes to ZIKV and held them at between 17 and 31°C, estimated the time required for mosquitoes to become infectious, and applied these data to a ZIKV spatial risk model. We identified a minimum temperature threshold for the transmission of ZIKV by mosquitoes between 17 and 19°C. Using these data, we generated standardized basic reproduction number R0-based risk maps and we derived estimates for the length of the transmission season for recent and future climate conditions. Our standardized R0-based risk maps show potential risk of ZIKV transmission beyond the current observed range in southern USA, southern China and southern European countries. Transmission risk is simulated to increase over southern and Eastern Europe, northern USA and temperate regions of Asia (northern China, southern Japan) in future climate scenarios.",
keywords = "Aedes, climate change, EIP, R0, Zika, Aedes albopictus, article, basic reproduction number, China, detritus, Eastern Europe, Japan, nonhuman, Ochlerotatus, risk assessment, season, simulation, virus transmission, Zika virus",
author = "M.S.C. Blagrove and C. Caminade and P.J. Diggle and E.I. Patterson and K. Sherlock and G.E. Chapman and J. Hesson and S. Metelmann and P.J. McCall and G. Lycett and J. Medlock and G.L. Hughes and {Della Torre}, A. and M. Baylis",
year = "2020",
month = jul,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1098/rspb.2020.0119",
language = "English",
volume = "287",
journal = "Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8452",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry Publishing",
number = "1930",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential for Zika virus transmission by mosquitoes in temperate climates

AU - Blagrove, M.S.C.

AU - Caminade, C.

AU - Diggle, P.J.

AU - Patterson, E.I.

AU - Sherlock, K.

AU - Chapman, G.E.

AU - Hesson, J.

AU - Metelmann, S.

AU - McCall, P.J.

AU - Lycett, G.

AU - Medlock, J.

AU - Hughes, G.L.

AU - Della Torre, A.

AU - Baylis, M.

PY - 2020/7/8

Y1 - 2020/7/8

N2 - Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) transmission has almost exclusively been detected in the tropics despite the distributions of its primary vectors extending farther into temperate regions. Therefore, it is unknown whether ZIKV's range has reached a temperature-dependent limit, or if it can spread into temperate climates. Using field-collected mosquitoes for biological relevance, we found that two common temperate mosquito species, Aedes albopictus and Ochlerotatus detritus, were competent for ZIKV. We orally exposed mosquitoes to ZIKV and held them at between 17 and 31°C, estimated the time required for mosquitoes to become infectious, and applied these data to a ZIKV spatial risk model. We identified a minimum temperature threshold for the transmission of ZIKV by mosquitoes between 17 and 19°C. Using these data, we generated standardized basic reproduction number R0-based risk maps and we derived estimates for the length of the transmission season for recent and future climate conditions. Our standardized R0-based risk maps show potential risk of ZIKV transmission beyond the current observed range in southern USA, southern China and southern European countries. Transmission risk is simulated to increase over southern and Eastern Europe, northern USA and temperate regions of Asia (northern China, southern Japan) in future climate scenarios.

AB - Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) transmission has almost exclusively been detected in the tropics despite the distributions of its primary vectors extending farther into temperate regions. Therefore, it is unknown whether ZIKV's range has reached a temperature-dependent limit, or if it can spread into temperate climates. Using field-collected mosquitoes for biological relevance, we found that two common temperate mosquito species, Aedes albopictus and Ochlerotatus detritus, were competent for ZIKV. We orally exposed mosquitoes to ZIKV and held them at between 17 and 31°C, estimated the time required for mosquitoes to become infectious, and applied these data to a ZIKV spatial risk model. We identified a minimum temperature threshold for the transmission of ZIKV by mosquitoes between 17 and 19°C. Using these data, we generated standardized basic reproduction number R0-based risk maps and we derived estimates for the length of the transmission season for recent and future climate conditions. Our standardized R0-based risk maps show potential risk of ZIKV transmission beyond the current observed range in southern USA, southern China and southern European countries. Transmission risk is simulated to increase over southern and Eastern Europe, northern USA and temperate regions of Asia (northern China, southern Japan) in future climate scenarios.

KW - Aedes

KW - climate change

KW - EIP

KW - R0

KW - Zika

KW - Aedes albopictus

KW - article

KW - basic reproduction number

KW - China

KW - detritus

KW - Eastern Europe

KW - Japan

KW - nonhuman

KW - Ochlerotatus

KW - risk assessment

KW - season

KW - simulation

KW - virus transmission

KW - Zika virus

U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2020.0119

DO - 10.1098/rspb.2020.0119

M3 - Journal article

VL - 287

JO - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8452

IS - 1930

M1 - 20200119

ER -