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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Trends in Ecology and Evolution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 32, 11, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011

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Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology

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Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology. / Connolly, Sean R.; Keith, Sally A.; Colwell, Robert K.; Rahbek, Carsten.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 32, No. 11, 11.2017, p. 835-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Connolly, SR, Keith, SA, Colwell, RK & Rahbek, C 2017, 'Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology', Trends in Ecology and Evolution, vol. 32, no. 11, pp. 835-844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011

APA

Connolly, S. R., Keith, S. A., Colwell, R. K., & Rahbek, C. (2017). Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 32(11), 835-844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011

Vancouver

Connolly SR, Keith SA, Colwell RK, Rahbek C. Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2017 Nov;32(11):835-844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011

Author

Connolly, Sean R. ; Keith, Sally A. ; Colwell, Robert K. ; Rahbek, Carsten. / Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 11. pp. 835-844.

Bibtex

@article{5c46815c58f44d148096714b6442cc3a,
title = "Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology",
abstract = "Macroecology has traditionally relied on descriptive characterization of large-scale ecological patterns to offer narrative explanations for the origin and maintenance of those patterns. Only recently have macroecologists begun to employ models termed {\textquoteleft}process-based{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}mechanistic{\textquoteright}, in contrast to other areas of ecology, where such models have a longer history. Here, we define and differentiate between process-based and mechanistic features of models, and we identify and discuss important advantages of working with models possessing such features. We describe some of the risks associated with process-based and mechanistic model-centered research programs, and we propose ways to mitigate these risks. Giving process-based and mechanistic models a more central role in research programs can reinvigorate macroecology by strengthening the link between theory and data.",
keywords = "biogeography, mechanistic models, macroecology, model-based ecology, process-based models, virtual worlds",
author = "Connolly, {Sean R.} and Keith, {Sally A.} and Colwell, {Robert K.} and Carsten Rahbek",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Trends in Ecology and Evolution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 32, 11, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011",
year = "2017",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "835--844",
journal = "Trends in Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "0169-5347",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCIENCE LONDON",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology

AU - Connolly, Sean R.

AU - Keith, Sally A.

AU - Colwell, Robert K.

AU - Rahbek, Carsten

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Trends in Ecology and Evolution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 32, 11, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011

PY - 2017/11

Y1 - 2017/11

N2 - Macroecology has traditionally relied on descriptive characterization of large-scale ecological patterns to offer narrative explanations for the origin and maintenance of those patterns. Only recently have macroecologists begun to employ models termed ‘process-based’ and ‘mechanistic’, in contrast to other areas of ecology, where such models have a longer history. Here, we define and differentiate between process-based and mechanistic features of models, and we identify and discuss important advantages of working with models possessing such features. We describe some of the risks associated with process-based and mechanistic model-centered research programs, and we propose ways to mitigate these risks. Giving process-based and mechanistic models a more central role in research programs can reinvigorate macroecology by strengthening the link between theory and data.

AB - Macroecology has traditionally relied on descriptive characterization of large-scale ecological patterns to offer narrative explanations for the origin and maintenance of those patterns. Only recently have macroecologists begun to employ models termed ‘process-based’ and ‘mechanistic’, in contrast to other areas of ecology, where such models have a longer history. Here, we define and differentiate between process-based and mechanistic features of models, and we identify and discuss important advantages of working with models possessing such features. We describe some of the risks associated with process-based and mechanistic model-centered research programs, and we propose ways to mitigate these risks. Giving process-based and mechanistic models a more central role in research programs can reinvigorate macroecology by strengthening the link between theory and data.

KW - biogeography

KW - mechanistic models

KW - macroecology

KW - model-based ecology

KW - process-based models

KW - virtual worlds

U2 - 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011

DO - 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 835

EP - 844

JO - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

JF - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

SN - 0169-5347

IS - 11

ER -