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Recovery-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy for recent-onset bipolar disorder: randomised controlled pilot trial

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Recovery-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy for recent-onset bipolar disorder : randomised controlled pilot trial. / Jones, Steven H.; Smith, Gina; Mulligan, Lee D.; Lobban, Fiona; Law, Heather; Dunn, Graham; Welford, Mary; Kelly, James; Mulligan, John; Morrison, Anthony P.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 206, No. 1, 01.2015, p. 58-66.

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Jones, Steven H. ; Smith, Gina ; Mulligan, Lee D. ; Lobban, Fiona ; Law, Heather ; Dunn, Graham ; Welford, Mary ; Kelly, James ; Mulligan, John ; Morrison, Anthony P. / Recovery-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy for recent-onset bipolar disorder : randomised controlled pilot trial. In: British Journal of Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 206, No. 1. pp. 58-66.

Bibtex

@article{0d4412af62ba4e1dbb5ea8285caec6a5,
title = "Recovery-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy for recent-onset bipolar disorder: randomised controlled pilot trial",
abstract = "Background Despite evidence for the effectiveness of structured psychological therapies for bipolar disorder no psychological interventions have been specifically designed to enhance personal recovery for individuals with recent-onset bipolar disorder. Aims A pilot study to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a new intervention, recovery-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), designed in collaboration with individuals with recent-onset bipolar disorder intended to improve clinical and personal recovery outcomes. Method A single, blind randomised controlled trial compared treatment as usual (TAU) with recovery-focused CBT plus TAU (n = 67). Results Recruitment and follow-up rates within 10% of pre-planned targets to 12-month follow-up were achieved. An average of 14.15 h (s.d. = 4.21) of recovery-focused CBT were attended out of a potential maximum of 18 h. Compared with TAU, recovery-focused CBT significantly improved personal recovery up to 12-month follow-up (Bipolar Recovery Questionnaire mean score 310.87, 95% CI 75.00-546.74 (s.e. = 120.34), P = 0.010, d = 0.62) and increased time to any mood relapse during up to 15 months follow-up (χ(2) = 7.64, P<0.006, estimated hazard ratio (HR) = 0.38, 95% CI 0.18-0.78). Groups did not differ with respect to medication adherence. Conclusions Recovery-focused CBT seems promising with respect to feasibility and potential clinical effectiveness. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness now need to be reliably estimated in a definitive trial.",
author = "Jones, {Steven H.} and Gina Smith and Mulligan, {Lee D.} and Fiona Lobban and Heather Law and Graham Dunn and Mary Welford and James Kelly and John Mulligan and Morrison, {Anthony P.}",
year = "2015",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1192/bjp.bp.113.141259",
language = "English",
volume = "206",
pages = "58--66",
journal = "British Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0007-1250",
publisher = "Royal College of Psychiatrists",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recovery-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy for recent-onset bipolar disorder

T2 - randomised controlled pilot trial

AU - Jones, Steven H.

AU - Smith, Gina

AU - Mulligan, Lee D.

AU - Lobban, Fiona

AU - Law, Heather

AU - Dunn, Graham

AU - Welford, Mary

AU - Kelly, James

AU - Mulligan, John

AU - Morrison, Anthony P.

PY - 2015/1

Y1 - 2015/1

N2 - Background Despite evidence for the effectiveness of structured psychological therapies for bipolar disorder no psychological interventions have been specifically designed to enhance personal recovery for individuals with recent-onset bipolar disorder. Aims A pilot study to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a new intervention, recovery-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), designed in collaboration with individuals with recent-onset bipolar disorder intended to improve clinical and personal recovery outcomes. Method A single, blind randomised controlled trial compared treatment as usual (TAU) with recovery-focused CBT plus TAU (n = 67). Results Recruitment and follow-up rates within 10% of pre-planned targets to 12-month follow-up were achieved. An average of 14.15 h (s.d. = 4.21) of recovery-focused CBT were attended out of a potential maximum of 18 h. Compared with TAU, recovery-focused CBT significantly improved personal recovery up to 12-month follow-up (Bipolar Recovery Questionnaire mean score 310.87, 95% CI 75.00-546.74 (s.e. = 120.34), P = 0.010, d = 0.62) and increased time to any mood relapse during up to 15 months follow-up (χ(2) = 7.64, P<0.006, estimated hazard ratio (HR) = 0.38, 95% CI 0.18-0.78). Groups did not differ with respect to medication adherence. Conclusions Recovery-focused CBT seems promising with respect to feasibility and potential clinical effectiveness. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness now need to be reliably estimated in a definitive trial.

AB - Background Despite evidence for the effectiveness of structured psychological therapies for bipolar disorder no psychological interventions have been specifically designed to enhance personal recovery for individuals with recent-onset bipolar disorder. Aims A pilot study to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a new intervention, recovery-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), designed in collaboration with individuals with recent-onset bipolar disorder intended to improve clinical and personal recovery outcomes. Method A single, blind randomised controlled trial compared treatment as usual (TAU) with recovery-focused CBT plus TAU (n = 67). Results Recruitment and follow-up rates within 10% of pre-planned targets to 12-month follow-up were achieved. An average of 14.15 h (s.d. = 4.21) of recovery-focused CBT were attended out of a potential maximum of 18 h. Compared with TAU, recovery-focused CBT significantly improved personal recovery up to 12-month follow-up (Bipolar Recovery Questionnaire mean score 310.87, 95% CI 75.00-546.74 (s.e. = 120.34), P = 0.010, d = 0.62) and increased time to any mood relapse during up to 15 months follow-up (χ(2) = 7.64, P<0.006, estimated hazard ratio (HR) = 0.38, 95% CI 0.18-0.78). Groups did not differ with respect to medication adherence. Conclusions Recovery-focused CBT seems promising with respect to feasibility and potential clinical effectiveness. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness now need to be reliably estimated in a definitive trial.

U2 - 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.141259

DO - 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.141259

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25213157

VL - 206

SP - 58

EP - 66

JO - British Journal of Psychiatry

JF - British Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0007-1250

IS - 1

ER -