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Reducing antipsychotic medication in people with a learning disability.

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Reducing antipsychotic medication in people with a learning disability. / Ahmed, Zahir; Fraser, William I.; Kerr, Michael P.; Kiernan, Chris; Emerson, Eric; Robertson, Janet; Felce, David; Allen, David; Baxter, Helen; Thomas, James.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 176, No. 1, 01.2000, p. 42-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Ahmed, Z, Fraser, WI, Kerr, MP, Kiernan, C, Emerson, E, Robertson, J, Felce, D, Allen, D, Baxter, H & Thomas, J 2000, 'Reducing antipsychotic medication in people with a learning disability.', British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 176, no. 1, pp. 42-46. <http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/content/abstract/176/1/42>

APA

Ahmed, Z., Fraser, W. I., Kerr, M. P., Kiernan, C., Emerson, E., Robertson, J., Felce, D., Allen, D., Baxter, H., & Thomas, J. (2000). Reducing antipsychotic medication in people with a learning disability. British Journal of Psychiatry, 176(1), 42-46. http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/content/abstract/176/1/42

Vancouver

Ahmed Z, Fraser WI, Kerr MP, Kiernan C, Emerson E, Robertson J et al. Reducing antipsychotic medication in people with a learning disability. British Journal of Psychiatry. 2000 Jan;176(1):42-46.

Author

Ahmed, Zahir ; Fraser, William I. ; Kerr, Michael P. ; Kiernan, Chris ; Emerson, Eric ; Robertson, Janet ; Felce, David ; Allen, David ; Baxter, Helen ; Thomas, James. / Reducing antipsychotic medication in people with a learning disability. In: British Journal of Psychiatry. 2000 ; Vol. 176, No. 1. pp. 42-46.

Bibtex

@article{b5a8f0aa413b428fb4f45b2007c16c63,
title = "Reducing antipsychotic medication in people with a learning disability.",
abstract = "Background The use of antipsychotic drugs in people with learning disabilities is currently receiving intensified scrutiny and attempts are being made to reduce it. Aims A randomised controlled trial was designed to investigate factors influencing antipsychotic drug reduction among people with learning disabilities prescribed such medication for behavioural problems. Method Thirty-six participants randomly allocated to the experimental group under went four, monthly 25% drug reduction stages. There were no planned drug changes for the control group (n=20). Results Twelve participants (33%) completed full withdrawal; a further seven (19%) achieved and maintained at least a 50% reduction. Drug reduction was associated with increased dyskinesia and higher activity engagement but not increased maladaptive behaviour. Some setting characteristics were associated with drug reinstatement. Conclusions A substantial proportion of people with learning disability prescribed antipsychotic medications for behavioural purposes rather than for treating psychotic illness can have their drugs reduced or withdrawn.",
author = "Zahir Ahmed and Fraser, {William I.} and Kerr, {Michael P.} and Chris Kiernan and Eric Emerson and Janet Robertson and David Felce and David Allen and Helen Baxter and James Thomas",
year = "2000",
month = jan,
language = "English",
volume = "176",
pages = "42--46",
journal = "British Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0007-1250",
publisher = "Royal College of Psychiatrists",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reducing antipsychotic medication in people with a learning disability.

AU - Ahmed, Zahir

AU - Fraser, William I.

AU - Kerr, Michael P.

AU - Kiernan, Chris

AU - Emerson, Eric

AU - Robertson, Janet

AU - Felce, David

AU - Allen, David

AU - Baxter, Helen

AU - Thomas, James

PY - 2000/1

Y1 - 2000/1

N2 - Background The use of antipsychotic drugs in people with learning disabilities is currently receiving intensified scrutiny and attempts are being made to reduce it. Aims A randomised controlled trial was designed to investigate factors influencing antipsychotic drug reduction among people with learning disabilities prescribed such medication for behavioural problems. Method Thirty-six participants randomly allocated to the experimental group under went four, monthly 25% drug reduction stages. There were no planned drug changes for the control group (n=20). Results Twelve participants (33%) completed full withdrawal; a further seven (19%) achieved and maintained at least a 50% reduction. Drug reduction was associated with increased dyskinesia and higher activity engagement but not increased maladaptive behaviour. Some setting characteristics were associated with drug reinstatement. Conclusions A substantial proportion of people with learning disability prescribed antipsychotic medications for behavioural purposes rather than for treating psychotic illness can have their drugs reduced or withdrawn.

AB - Background The use of antipsychotic drugs in people with learning disabilities is currently receiving intensified scrutiny and attempts are being made to reduce it. Aims A randomised controlled trial was designed to investigate factors influencing antipsychotic drug reduction among people with learning disabilities prescribed such medication for behavioural problems. Method Thirty-six participants randomly allocated to the experimental group under went four, monthly 25% drug reduction stages. There were no planned drug changes for the control group (n=20). Results Twelve participants (33%) completed full withdrawal; a further seven (19%) achieved and maintained at least a 50% reduction. Drug reduction was associated with increased dyskinesia and higher activity engagement but not increased maladaptive behaviour. Some setting characteristics were associated with drug reinstatement. Conclusions A substantial proportion of people with learning disability prescribed antipsychotic medications for behavioural purposes rather than for treating psychotic illness can have their drugs reduced or withdrawn.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 176

SP - 42

EP - 46

JO - British Journal of Psychiatry

JF - British Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0007-1250

IS - 1

ER -