Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Religion and Brexit

Electronic data

  • Brexit - final revised

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Religion, State and Society on 15/08/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09637494.2018.1483861

    Accepted author manuscript, 399 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Religion and Brexit: populism and the Church of England

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Religion, State and Society
Issue number3
Volume46
Number of pages18
Pages (from-to)206-223
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date15/08/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Drawing on our own recent surveys on beliefs and values in Great Britain (Woodhead) and evangelical Christians in the UK (Smith) this article explores the links between religion, views and votes on leaving or remaining in the EU in the UK’s 2016 referendum. Poll data gathered shortly after the 2016 referendum (n = 3,243) allows us to test associations between religious identity and behaviour and attitudes to voting Leave, while controlling for other demographic variables. The main finding is that identifying as Church of England (Anglican) is an important independent predictor of voting Leave even when other relevant factors like age and region are corrected for. By contrast, self-defined English evangelicals (from an opportunity sample of 1,198, collected and analysed by Smith) appear to be more pro-EU and generally internationalist in outlook. Previous surveys by Woodhead on religion and values in the UK provide some explanation for these findings, and for the striking difference of UK and US evangelicals, 81% of whom supported Donald Trump in the 2016 US presidential election. The article ends with reflections on whether the term ‘populist’ can be usefully applied to the evangelical pro-Trump vote in the US or the Church of England pro-Brexit vote in the UK. © 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Religion, State and Society on 15/08/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09637494.2018.1483861