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Religious circumcision, invasive rites, neutrality and equality: bearing the burdens and consequences of belief

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Religious circumcision, invasive rites, neutrality and equality : bearing the burdens and consequences of belief. / Johnson, Matthew.

In: Journal of Medical Ethics, Vol. 39, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 450-455.

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@article{8cab13d9927642468acb1cacc0717aa8,
title = "Religious circumcision, invasive rites, neutrality and equality: bearing the burdens and consequences of belief",
abstract = "The decision of the German regional court in Cologne on 26 June 2012 to prohibit the circumcision of minors is important insofar as it recognises the qualitative similarities between the practice and other prohibited invasive rites, such as female genital cutting. However, recognition of similarity poses serious questions with regard to liberal public policy, specifically with regard to the exceptionalist treatment demanded by certain circumcising groups. In this paper, I seek to advance egalitarian means of dealing with invasive rites which take seriously cultural diversity, minimise harm and place responsibility for the burdens and consequences of beliefs upon those who promote practices.",
author = "Matthew Johnson",
year = "2013",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1136/medethics-2012-101217",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "450--455",
journal = "Journal of Medical Ethics",
issn = "0306-6800",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Religious circumcision, invasive rites, neutrality and equality

T2 - bearing the burdens and consequences of belief

AU - Johnson, Matthew

PY - 2013/7

Y1 - 2013/7

N2 - The decision of the German regional court in Cologne on 26 June 2012 to prohibit the circumcision of minors is important insofar as it recognises the qualitative similarities between the practice and other prohibited invasive rites, such as female genital cutting. However, recognition of similarity poses serious questions with regard to liberal public policy, specifically with regard to the exceptionalist treatment demanded by certain circumcising groups. In this paper, I seek to advance egalitarian means of dealing with invasive rites which take seriously cultural diversity, minimise harm and place responsibility for the burdens and consequences of beliefs upon those who promote practices.

AB - The decision of the German regional court in Cologne on 26 June 2012 to prohibit the circumcision of minors is important insofar as it recognises the qualitative similarities between the practice and other prohibited invasive rites, such as female genital cutting. However, recognition of similarity poses serious questions with regard to liberal public policy, specifically with regard to the exceptionalist treatment demanded by certain circumcising groups. In this paper, I seek to advance egalitarian means of dealing with invasive rites which take seriously cultural diversity, minimise harm and place responsibility for the burdens and consequences of beliefs upon those who promote practices.

U2 - 10.1136/medethics-2012-101217

DO - 10.1136/medethics-2012-101217

M3 - Journal article

VL - 39

SP - 450

EP - 455

JO - Journal of Medical Ethics

JF - Journal of Medical Ethics

SN - 0306-6800

IS - 7

ER -