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  • Self-Efficacy of Older People Using Technology to Self-Manage COPD, Hypertension, Heart Failure or Dementia at Home: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    Rights statement: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The Gerontologist following peer review. Garuth Chalfont, PhD, Céu Mateus, PhD, Sandra Varey, PhD, Christine Milligan, PhD, Self-Efficacy of Older People Using Technology to Self-Manage COPD, Hypertension, Heart Failure, or Dementia at Home: An Overview of Systematic Reviews, The Gerontologist, Volume 61, Issue 6, September 2021, Pages e318–e334, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnaa045 The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/geront/gnaa045/5856419

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Self-efficacy of older people using technology to self-manage COPD, hypertension, heart failure or dementia at home: An overview of systematic reviews

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Self-efficacy of older people using technology to self-manage COPD, hypertension, heart failure or dementia at home : An overview of systematic reviews. / Chalfont, Garuth; Mateus, Ceu; Varey, Sandra; Milligan, Christine.

In: The Gerontologist, Vol. 61, No. 6, 30.09.2021, p. e318-e334.

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@article{395d23975dc5439c8e8fc198e5882eeb,
title = "Self-efficacy of older people using technology to self-manage COPD, hypertension, heart failure or dementia at home: An overview of systematic reviews",
abstract = "Background and ObjectivesAlthough telehealth research among the general population is voluminous, study quality is low and results are mixed. Little is known specifically concerning older people and their self-efficacy to engage with and benefit from such technologies. This paper reviews the evidence for which self-care telehealth technology supports the self-efficacy of older people with long-term conditions (LTCs) living at home. Research Design and Methods Following PRISMA guidelines, this overview of systematic reviews focused on four LTCs and the concept of {\textquoteleft}self-efficacy{\textquoteright}. Quality was appraised using R-AMSTAR and study evaluation was guided by the PRISMS taxonomy for reporting of self-management support. Heterogeneous data evidencing technology-enhanced self-efficacy were narratively synthesised.Results Five included papers contained 74 primary studies involving 9,004 participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hypertension, heart failure or dementia. Evidence for self-care telehealth technology supporting self-efficacy of older people with LTCs living at home was limited. Self-efficacy was rarely an outcome, also attrition and drop-out rates and mediators of support or education. The pathway from telehealth to self-efficacy depended on telehealth modes and techniques promoting healthy lifestyles. Increased self-care and self-monitoring empowered self-efficacy, patient-activation or mastery.Discussion and ImplicationsFuture research needs to focus on the process by which the intervention works and the effects of mediating variables and mechanisms through which self-management is achieved. Self-efficacy, patient-activation, and motivation are critical components to telehealth{\textquoteright}s adoption by the patient, and hence to the success of self-care in self-management of LTCs. Their invisibility as outcomes is a limitation.",
keywords = "telehealth, living at home, long-term conditions, self-care, self-management",
author = "Garuth Chalfont and Ceu Mateus and Sandra Varey and Christine Milligan",
note = "This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The Gerontologist following peer review. Garuth Chalfont, PhD, C{\'e}u Mateus, PhD, Sandra Varey, PhD, Christine Milligan, PhD, Self-Efficacy of Older People Using Technology to Self-Manage COPD, Hypertension, Heart Failure, or Dementia at Home: An Overview of Systematic Reviews, The Gerontologist, Volume 61, Issue 6, September 2021, Pages e318–e334, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnaa045 The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/geront/gnaa045/5856419",
year = "2021",
month = sep,
day = "30",
doi = "10.1093/geront/gnaa045",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "e318--e334",
journal = "The Gerontologist",
issn = "0016-9013",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-efficacy of older people using technology to self-manage COPD, hypertension, heart failure or dementia at home

T2 - An overview of systematic reviews

AU - Chalfont, Garuth

AU - Mateus, Ceu

AU - Varey, Sandra

AU - Milligan, Christine

N1 - This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The Gerontologist following peer review. Garuth Chalfont, PhD, Céu Mateus, PhD, Sandra Varey, PhD, Christine Milligan, PhD, Self-Efficacy of Older People Using Technology to Self-Manage COPD, Hypertension, Heart Failure, or Dementia at Home: An Overview of Systematic Reviews, The Gerontologist, Volume 61, Issue 6, September 2021, Pages e318–e334, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnaa045 The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/geront/gnaa045/5856419

PY - 2021/9/30

Y1 - 2021/9/30

N2 - Background and ObjectivesAlthough telehealth research among the general population is voluminous, study quality is low and results are mixed. Little is known specifically concerning older people and their self-efficacy to engage with and benefit from such technologies. This paper reviews the evidence for which self-care telehealth technology supports the self-efficacy of older people with long-term conditions (LTCs) living at home. Research Design and Methods Following PRISMA guidelines, this overview of systematic reviews focused on four LTCs and the concept of ‘self-efficacy’. Quality was appraised using R-AMSTAR and study evaluation was guided by the PRISMS taxonomy for reporting of self-management support. Heterogeneous data evidencing technology-enhanced self-efficacy were narratively synthesised.Results Five included papers contained 74 primary studies involving 9,004 participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hypertension, heart failure or dementia. Evidence for self-care telehealth technology supporting self-efficacy of older people with LTCs living at home was limited. Self-efficacy was rarely an outcome, also attrition and drop-out rates and mediators of support or education. The pathway from telehealth to self-efficacy depended on telehealth modes and techniques promoting healthy lifestyles. Increased self-care and self-monitoring empowered self-efficacy, patient-activation or mastery.Discussion and ImplicationsFuture research needs to focus on the process by which the intervention works and the effects of mediating variables and mechanisms through which self-management is achieved. Self-efficacy, patient-activation, and motivation are critical components to telehealth’s adoption by the patient, and hence to the success of self-care in self-management of LTCs. Their invisibility as outcomes is a limitation.

AB - Background and ObjectivesAlthough telehealth research among the general population is voluminous, study quality is low and results are mixed. Little is known specifically concerning older people and their self-efficacy to engage with and benefit from such technologies. This paper reviews the evidence for which self-care telehealth technology supports the self-efficacy of older people with long-term conditions (LTCs) living at home. Research Design and Methods Following PRISMA guidelines, this overview of systematic reviews focused on four LTCs and the concept of ‘self-efficacy’. Quality was appraised using R-AMSTAR and study evaluation was guided by the PRISMS taxonomy for reporting of self-management support. Heterogeneous data evidencing technology-enhanced self-efficacy were narratively synthesised.Results Five included papers contained 74 primary studies involving 9,004 participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hypertension, heart failure or dementia. Evidence for self-care telehealth technology supporting self-efficacy of older people with LTCs living at home was limited. Self-efficacy was rarely an outcome, also attrition and drop-out rates and mediators of support or education. The pathway from telehealth to self-efficacy depended on telehealth modes and techniques promoting healthy lifestyles. Increased self-care and self-monitoring empowered self-efficacy, patient-activation or mastery.Discussion and ImplicationsFuture research needs to focus on the process by which the intervention works and the effects of mediating variables and mechanisms through which self-management is achieved. Self-efficacy, patient-activation, and motivation are critical components to telehealth’s adoption by the patient, and hence to the success of self-care in self-management of LTCs. Their invisibility as outcomes is a limitation.

KW - telehealth

KW - living at home

KW - long-term conditions

KW - self-care

KW - self-management

U2 - 10.1093/geront/gnaa045

DO - 10.1093/geront/gnaa045

M3 - Journal article

VL - 61

SP - e318-e334

JO - The Gerontologist

JF - The Gerontologist

SN - 0016-9013

IS - 6

ER -