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Separating the role of direct radiative heating and photolysis in modulating the atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing

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Separating the role of direct radiative heating and photolysis in modulating the atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing. / Bednarz, Ewa Monika; Maycock, Amanda C.; Braesicke, Peter; Telford, Paul J.; Abraham, N. Luke; Pyle, John A.

In: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics , Vol. 19, No. 15, 02.08.2019, p. 9833-9846.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Bednarz, EM, Maycock, AC, Braesicke, P, Telford, PJ, Abraham, NL & Pyle, JA 2019, 'Separating the role of direct radiative heating and photolysis in modulating the atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing', Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics , vol. 19, no. 15, pp. 9833-9846. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-321

APA

Bednarz, E. M., Maycock, A. C., Braesicke, P., Telford, P. J., Abraham, N. L., & Pyle, J. A. (2019). Separating the role of direct radiative heating and photolysis in modulating the atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics , 19(15), 9833-9846. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-321

Vancouver

Bednarz EM, Maycock AC, Braesicke P, Telford PJ, Abraham NL, Pyle JA. Separating the role of direct radiative heating and photolysis in modulating the atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics . 2019 Aug 2;19(15):9833-9846. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-321

Author

Bednarz, Ewa Monika ; Maycock, Amanda C. ; Braesicke, Peter ; Telford, Paul J. ; Abraham, N. Luke ; Pyle, John A. / Separating the role of direct radiative heating and photolysis in modulating the atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing. In: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics . 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 15. pp. 9833-9846.

Bibtex

@article{eb4a4e186487458c8b84ba73b686d763,
title = "Separating the role of direct radiative heating and photolysis in modulating the atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing",
abstract = "The atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing is separated into the contributions from changes in direct radiative heating and photolysis rates using specially designed sensitivity simulations with the UM-UKCA chemistry-climate model. We find that contributions from changes in direct heating and photolysis rates are important for determining the shortwave heating, temperature and ozone responses to the solar cycle forcing. The combined effects of the processes are found to be largely additive in the tropics but non-additive in the high latitudes, in particular in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) during the dynamically active season. We find marked differences in the changes in magnitude and vertical structure of shortwave heating rates gradients across the SH in austral winter, thereby highlighting a potential sensitivity of the polar dynamical response to the altitude of the anomalous radiative tendencies. In addition, our results indicate that, in contrast to the original mechanism proposed in the literature, the solar-induced changes in the horizontal shortwave heating rate gradients not only in autumn/early winter, but throughout the dynamically active season are important for modulating the dynamical response. In spring, these gradients are strongly influenced by the shortwave heating anomalies at higher southern latitudes, which are closely linked to the concurrent changes in ozone. Our results suggest that solar-induced changes in ozone, both in the tropics/mid-latitudes and the polar regions, are important for modulating the SH dynamical response to the 11-year solar cycle. In addition, the markedly non-additive character of the SH polar vortex response simulated in austral spring highlights the need for consistent model implementation of the solar cycle forcing in both the radiative heating and photolysis schemes.",
author = "Bednarz, {Ewa Monika} and Maycock, {Amanda C.} and Peter Braesicke and Telford, {Paul J.} and Abraham, {N. Luke} and Pyle, {John A.}",
year = "2019",
month = aug,
day = "2",
doi = "10.5194/acp-2018-321",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "9833--9846",
journal = "Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics ",
issn = "1680-7316",
publisher = "Copernicus GmbH (Copernicus Publications) on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)",
number = "15",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Separating the role of direct radiative heating and photolysis in modulating the atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing

AU - Bednarz, Ewa Monika

AU - Maycock, Amanda C.

AU - Braesicke, Peter

AU - Telford, Paul J.

AU - Abraham, N. Luke

AU - Pyle, John A.

PY - 2019/8/2

Y1 - 2019/8/2

N2 - The atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing is separated into the contributions from changes in direct radiative heating and photolysis rates using specially designed sensitivity simulations with the UM-UKCA chemistry-climate model. We find that contributions from changes in direct heating and photolysis rates are important for determining the shortwave heating, temperature and ozone responses to the solar cycle forcing. The combined effects of the processes are found to be largely additive in the tropics but non-additive in the high latitudes, in particular in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) during the dynamically active season. We find marked differences in the changes in magnitude and vertical structure of shortwave heating rates gradients across the SH in austral winter, thereby highlighting a potential sensitivity of the polar dynamical response to the altitude of the anomalous radiative tendencies. In addition, our results indicate that, in contrast to the original mechanism proposed in the literature, the solar-induced changes in the horizontal shortwave heating rate gradients not only in autumn/early winter, but throughout the dynamically active season are important for modulating the dynamical response. In spring, these gradients are strongly influenced by the shortwave heating anomalies at higher southern latitudes, which are closely linked to the concurrent changes in ozone. Our results suggest that solar-induced changes in ozone, both in the tropics/mid-latitudes and the polar regions, are important for modulating the SH dynamical response to the 11-year solar cycle. In addition, the markedly non-additive character of the SH polar vortex response simulated in austral spring highlights the need for consistent model implementation of the solar cycle forcing in both the radiative heating and photolysis schemes.

AB - The atmospheric response to the 11-year solar cycle forcing is separated into the contributions from changes in direct radiative heating and photolysis rates using specially designed sensitivity simulations with the UM-UKCA chemistry-climate model. We find that contributions from changes in direct heating and photolysis rates are important for determining the shortwave heating, temperature and ozone responses to the solar cycle forcing. The combined effects of the processes are found to be largely additive in the tropics but non-additive in the high latitudes, in particular in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) during the dynamically active season. We find marked differences in the changes in magnitude and vertical structure of shortwave heating rates gradients across the SH in austral winter, thereby highlighting a potential sensitivity of the polar dynamical response to the altitude of the anomalous radiative tendencies. In addition, our results indicate that, in contrast to the original mechanism proposed in the literature, the solar-induced changes in the horizontal shortwave heating rate gradients not only in autumn/early winter, but throughout the dynamically active season are important for modulating the dynamical response. In spring, these gradients are strongly influenced by the shortwave heating anomalies at higher southern latitudes, which are closely linked to the concurrent changes in ozone. Our results suggest that solar-induced changes in ozone, both in the tropics/mid-latitudes and the polar regions, are important for modulating the SH dynamical response to the 11-year solar cycle. In addition, the markedly non-additive character of the SH polar vortex response simulated in austral spring highlights the need for consistent model implementation of the solar cycle forcing in both the radiative heating and photolysis schemes.

U2 - 10.5194/acp-2018-321

DO - 10.5194/acp-2018-321

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

SP - 9833

EP - 9846

JO - Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

JF - Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

SN - 1680-7316

IS - 15

ER -