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Shoulder surfing defence for recall-based graphical passwords

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Published
  • Nur Haryani Zakaria
  • David Griffiths
  • Sacha Brostoff
  • Jeff Yan
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Publication date2011
Host publicationSOUPS 2011 - Proceedings of the 7th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
ISBN (Print)9781450309110
<mark>Original language</mark>English
Event7th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security, SOUPS 2011 - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: 20/07/201122/07/2011

Conference

Conference7th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security, SOUPS 2011
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period20/07/1122/07/11

Conference

Conference7th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security, SOUPS 2011
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period20/07/1122/07/11

Abstract

Graphical passwords are often considered prone to shoulder-surfing attacks, where attackers can steal a user's password by peeking over his or her shoulder in the authentication process. In this paper, we explore shoulder surfing defence for recall-based graphical password systems such as Draw-A-Secret and Background Draw-A-Secret, where users doodle their passwords (i.e. secrets) on a drawing grid. We propose three innovative shoulder surfing defence techniques, and conduct two separate controlled laboratory experiments to evaluate both security and usability perspectives of the proposed techniques. One technique was expected to work to some extent theoretically, but it turned out to provide little protection. One technique provided the best overall shoulder surfing defence, but also caused some usability challenges. The other technique achieved reasonable shoulder surfing defence and good usability simultaneously, a good balance which the two other techniques did not achieve. Our results appear to be also relevant to other graphical password systems such as Pass-Go.