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  • FMS-manuscript GarciaMingo and PrietoBlanco

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Feminist Media Studies on 23/10/2021, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14680777.2021.1980079

    Accepted author manuscript, 637 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 23/04/23

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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#SisterIdobelieveyou: Performative hashtags against patriarchal justice in Spain

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>23/10/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Feminist Media Studies
Number of pages17
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date23/10/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

In recent years, anti-rape culture and anti-rape communication have taken new forms, including the diverse use of tweets and hashtags, prompting so-called hashtag feminism. In this article, we examine digital and analogue discussions propelled by a notorious case of gang-rape in Spain in 2016, which became known as “La Manada”/The Wolf Pack” (hereafter TWP). Hundreds of thousands of Spanish women took to the streets in protest during the three years of the case and their chants also flooded social media. This article is the result of a hashtag ethnography of the hashtag #SisterIdobelieveyou. We argue that the synchronized performative action of “believing” undertaken by thousands of Twitter users, along with mass demonstrations on the streets, had a triple effect: it gave rise to a “virtual” community of sisterhood, challenged prevalent rape culture and gender stereotypes in Spanish society, and provided social media users with a new framework to conceive of and express themselves about sexual violence.  

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Feminist Media Studies on 23/10/2021, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14680777.2021.1980079