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Social aspects of bereavement.

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Social aspects of bereavement. / Field, D.; Payne, Sheila.

In: Cancer Nursing Practice, Vol. 2, No. 8, 2003, p. 21-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Field D, Payne S. Social aspects of bereavement. Cancer Nursing Practice. 2003;2(8):21-25.

Author

Field, D. ; Payne, Sheila. / Social aspects of bereavement. In: Cancer Nursing Practice. 2003 ; Vol. 2, No. 8. pp. 21-25.

Bibtex

@article{f6c12afbc86c4e82948a9062890ee8dc,
title = "Social aspects of bereavement.",
abstract = "The death of a family member is one of the most stressful and disruptive life events and, at some point in their career, all cancer nurses will come into contact with friends and relatives of a cancer patient who has died. This article aims to make nurses aware of the {\textquoteleft}new{\textquoteright} approach to understanding bereavement, one which challenges standard theories of how to deal with loss, and one which is still being overlooked in much of today{\textquoteright}s nursing education.",
keywords = "Bereavement, Death, Attitudes",
author = "D. Field and Sheila Payne",
year = "2003",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "21--25",
journal = "Cancer Nursing Practice",
issn = "1475-4266",
publisher = "RCN Publishing (RCNi)",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social aspects of bereavement.

AU - Field, D.

AU - Payne, Sheila

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - The death of a family member is one of the most stressful and disruptive life events and, at some point in their career, all cancer nurses will come into contact with friends and relatives of a cancer patient who has died. This article aims to make nurses aware of the ‘new’ approach to understanding bereavement, one which challenges standard theories of how to deal with loss, and one which is still being overlooked in much of today’s nursing education.

AB - The death of a family member is one of the most stressful and disruptive life events and, at some point in their career, all cancer nurses will come into contact with friends and relatives of a cancer patient who has died. This article aims to make nurses aware of the ‘new’ approach to understanding bereavement, one which challenges standard theories of how to deal with loss, and one which is still being overlooked in much of today’s nursing education.

KW - Bereavement

KW - Death

KW - Attitudes

M3 - Journal article

VL - 2

SP - 21

EP - 25

JO - Cancer Nursing Practice

JF - Cancer Nursing Practice

SN - 1475-4266

IS - 8

ER -