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Social drivers forewarn of marine regime shifts

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Social drivers forewarn of marine regime shifts. / Hicks, Christina; Crowder, Larry B.; Graham, Nicholas Anthony James et al.

In: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Vol. 14, No. 5, 06.2016, p. 252-260.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Hicks, C, Crowder, LB, Graham, NAJ, Kittinger, JN & Le Cornu, E 2016, 'Social drivers forewarn of marine regime shifts', Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 252-260. https://doi.org/10.1002/fee.1284

APA

Hicks, C., Crowder, L. B., Graham, N. A. J., Kittinger, J. N., & Le Cornu, E. (2016). Social drivers forewarn of marine regime shifts. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 14(5), 252-260. https://doi.org/10.1002/fee.1284

Vancouver

Hicks C, Crowder LB, Graham NAJ, Kittinger JN, Le Cornu E. Social drivers forewarn of marine regime shifts. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 2016 Jun;14(5):252-260. Epub 2016 Jun 1. doi: 10.1002/fee.1284

Author

Hicks, Christina ; Crowder, Larry B. ; Graham, Nicholas Anthony James et al. / Social drivers forewarn of marine regime shifts. In: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 2016 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 252-260.

Bibtex

@article{a6b2e31a031a4ce89d32d70f1b187d4e,
title = "Social drivers forewarn of marine regime shifts",
abstract = "Some ecosystems can undergo regime shifts to alternative compositions of species. Although ecological indicators can identify approaching regime shifts, we propose that rapid changes in the social drivers underlying ecosystem change may provide additional and potentially earlier indicators of impending shifts. We demonstrate this by reconstructing the underlying social drivers of four iconic marine regime shifts: Pacific kelp forests, Northwest Atlantic continental shelf, Jamaican coral reefs, and the Chesapeake Bay estuary. In all cases, a range of social drivers – including opening of lucrative markets, technological innovations, and policies that enhanced the driver – ultimately prompted these ecosystem shifts. Drawing on examples emerging from environmental management practice, we present three practical recommendations for using social drivers as early indicators: monitor social change, determine social trigger points, and identify policy responses. We argue that accounting for the underlying social drivers of ecosystem change could improve decision making.",
author = "Christina Hicks and Crowder, {Larry B.} and Graham, {Nicholas Anthony James} and Kittinger, {John N.} and {Le Cornu}, Elodie",
note = "Copyright by the Ecological Society of America",
year = "2016",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1002/fee.1284",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "252--260",
journal = "Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment",
issn = "1540-9295",
publisher = "ECOLOGICAL SOC AMER",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social drivers forewarn of marine regime shifts

AU - Hicks, Christina

AU - Crowder, Larry B.

AU - Graham, Nicholas Anthony James

AU - Kittinger, John N.

AU - Le Cornu, Elodie

N1 - Copyright by the Ecological Society of America

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - Some ecosystems can undergo regime shifts to alternative compositions of species. Although ecological indicators can identify approaching regime shifts, we propose that rapid changes in the social drivers underlying ecosystem change may provide additional and potentially earlier indicators of impending shifts. We demonstrate this by reconstructing the underlying social drivers of four iconic marine regime shifts: Pacific kelp forests, Northwest Atlantic continental shelf, Jamaican coral reefs, and the Chesapeake Bay estuary. In all cases, a range of social drivers – including opening of lucrative markets, technological innovations, and policies that enhanced the driver – ultimately prompted these ecosystem shifts. Drawing on examples emerging from environmental management practice, we present three practical recommendations for using social drivers as early indicators: monitor social change, determine social trigger points, and identify policy responses. We argue that accounting for the underlying social drivers of ecosystem change could improve decision making.

AB - Some ecosystems can undergo regime shifts to alternative compositions of species. Although ecological indicators can identify approaching regime shifts, we propose that rapid changes in the social drivers underlying ecosystem change may provide additional and potentially earlier indicators of impending shifts. We demonstrate this by reconstructing the underlying social drivers of four iconic marine regime shifts: Pacific kelp forests, Northwest Atlantic continental shelf, Jamaican coral reefs, and the Chesapeake Bay estuary. In all cases, a range of social drivers – including opening of lucrative markets, technological innovations, and policies that enhanced the driver – ultimately prompted these ecosystem shifts. Drawing on examples emerging from environmental management practice, we present three practical recommendations for using social drivers as early indicators: monitor social change, determine social trigger points, and identify policy responses. We argue that accounting for the underlying social drivers of ecosystem change could improve decision making.

U2 - 10.1002/fee.1284

DO - 10.1002/fee.1284

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 252

EP - 260

JO - Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

JF - Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

SN - 1540-9295

IS - 5

ER -