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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Ecological Indicators. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Ecological Indicators, 95, Part 1, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.07.062

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Spatial and temporal shifts in functional and taxonomic diversity of dung beetles in a human-modified tropical forest landscape

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Spatial and temporal shifts in functional and taxonomic diversity of dung beetles in a human-modified tropical forest landscape. / Beiroz, Wallace; Sayer, Emma Jane; Slade, Eleanor Margaret et al.

In: Ecological Indicators, Vol. 95, No. Part 1, 12.2018, p. 518-526.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Beiroz W, Sayer EJ, Slade EM, Audino L, Braga RF, Louzada JN et al. Spatial and temporal shifts in functional and taxonomic diversity of dung beetles in a human-modified tropical forest landscape. Ecological Indicators. 2018 Dec;95(Part 1):518-526. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

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Bibtex

@article{2e270b89194f49e29a2fe1176266ec7f,
title = "Spatial and temporal shifts in functional and taxonomic diversity of dung beetles in a human-modified tropical forest landscape",
abstract = "Functional diversity is commonly used to assess the conservation value of ecosystems, but we have not yet established whether functional and taxonomic approaches are interchangeable or complementary to evaluate community dynamics over time and in response to disturbances. We used a five-year dataset of dung beetles from undisturbed forest, primary forest corridors, and Eucalyptus plantations to compare the sensitivity of conceptually equivalent metrics to temporal variation in different anthropogenic disturbances. We compared species richness with functional richness, Pielou{\textquoteright}s evenness with functional evenness, and Simpson{\textquoteright}s diversity with Rao{\textquoteright}s quadratic entropy. We assessed the sensitivity of the metrics to anthropogenic changes. The indices showed complex patterns among habitat types, with with similar responses in some cases and not in other, and little incongruence between the pairs within the same year. The influence of disturbance on longer-term temporal variation over the five-year period revealed lower temporal variation in functional than taxonomic metrics. Both approaches showed greater variation in plantations compared to native forests. We evaluated the variation in taxonomic and functional metrics between consecutive years and among habitats. Most metrics showed similar shifts between years in all habitats, except for species and functional richness. We demonstrate that even conceptually similar indices may not provide similar information on dung beetles responses to disturbance. However, the differences between the indices can yield key insights about the drivers of change, especially over the long-term. It is important to use taxonomic and functional diversity in tandem to better understand community responses to environmental and anthropogenic changes.",
keywords = "Amazonia, Functional ecology, Land-use change, Scarabaeinae, Temporal dynamics",
author = "Wallace Beiroz and Sayer, {Emma Jane} and Slade, {Eleanor Margaret} and Livia Audino and Braga, {Rodrigo Fagundes} and Louzada, {Julio Neil} and Barlow, {Bernard Josiah}",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Ecological Indicators. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Ecological Indicators, 95, Part 1, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.07.062",
year = "2018",
month = dec,
language = "English",
volume = "95",
pages = "518--526",
journal = "Ecological Indicators",
issn = "1470-160X",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "Part 1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spatial and temporal shifts in functional and taxonomic diversity of dung beetles in a human-modified tropical forest landscape

AU - Beiroz, Wallace

AU - Sayer, Emma Jane

AU - Slade, Eleanor Margaret

AU - Audino, Livia

AU - Braga, Rodrigo Fagundes

AU - Louzada, Julio Neil

AU - Barlow, Bernard Josiah

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Ecological Indicators. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Ecological Indicators, 95, Part 1, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.07.062

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - Functional diversity is commonly used to assess the conservation value of ecosystems, but we have not yet established whether functional and taxonomic approaches are interchangeable or complementary to evaluate community dynamics over time and in response to disturbances. We used a five-year dataset of dung beetles from undisturbed forest, primary forest corridors, and Eucalyptus plantations to compare the sensitivity of conceptually equivalent metrics to temporal variation in different anthropogenic disturbances. We compared species richness with functional richness, Pielou’s evenness with functional evenness, and Simpson’s diversity with Rao’s quadratic entropy. We assessed the sensitivity of the metrics to anthropogenic changes. The indices showed complex patterns among habitat types, with with similar responses in some cases and not in other, and little incongruence between the pairs within the same year. The influence of disturbance on longer-term temporal variation over the five-year period revealed lower temporal variation in functional than taxonomic metrics. Both approaches showed greater variation in plantations compared to native forests. We evaluated the variation in taxonomic and functional metrics between consecutive years and among habitats. Most metrics showed similar shifts between years in all habitats, except for species and functional richness. We demonstrate that even conceptually similar indices may not provide similar information on dung beetles responses to disturbance. However, the differences between the indices can yield key insights about the drivers of change, especially over the long-term. It is important to use taxonomic and functional diversity in tandem to better understand community responses to environmental and anthropogenic changes.

AB - Functional diversity is commonly used to assess the conservation value of ecosystems, but we have not yet established whether functional and taxonomic approaches are interchangeable or complementary to evaluate community dynamics over time and in response to disturbances. We used a five-year dataset of dung beetles from undisturbed forest, primary forest corridors, and Eucalyptus plantations to compare the sensitivity of conceptually equivalent metrics to temporal variation in different anthropogenic disturbances. We compared species richness with functional richness, Pielou’s evenness with functional evenness, and Simpson’s diversity with Rao’s quadratic entropy. We assessed the sensitivity of the metrics to anthropogenic changes. The indices showed complex patterns among habitat types, with with similar responses in some cases and not in other, and little incongruence between the pairs within the same year. The influence of disturbance on longer-term temporal variation over the five-year period revealed lower temporal variation in functional than taxonomic metrics. Both approaches showed greater variation in plantations compared to native forests. We evaluated the variation in taxonomic and functional metrics between consecutive years and among habitats. Most metrics showed similar shifts between years in all habitats, except for species and functional richness. We demonstrate that even conceptually similar indices may not provide similar information on dung beetles responses to disturbance. However, the differences between the indices can yield key insights about the drivers of change, especially over the long-term. It is important to use taxonomic and functional diversity in tandem to better understand community responses to environmental and anthropogenic changes.

KW - Amazonia

KW - Functional ecology

KW - Land-use change

KW - Scarabaeinae

KW - Temporal dynamics

M3 - Journal article

VL - 95

SP - 518

EP - 526

JO - Ecological Indicators

JF - Ecological Indicators

SN - 1470-160X

IS - Part 1

ER -