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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 166, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2019.07.020

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Spatial persistence of agglomeration in software publishing

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/10/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
Volume166
Number of pages22
Pages (from-to)544-565
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date29/08/19
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

We estimate the effects of industrial localization on the spatial persistence of employment in the software industry, using establishment data from Texas for the 2000–2006 period. Locations with an initial concentration of software employment retain an excess number of employees, beyond that expected from job turnover and job persistence at the establishment level. This is not driven by differential establishment growth or survival, but it is due to (a) the retention by establishments in a location of jobs lost by other establishments in that location, and (b) the propensity of software establishments to enter in locations with prior software establishment presence. These findings are more consistent with labor channel effects than with disembodied knowledge spillovers.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 166, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2019.07.020