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  • journal.pntd.0000563

    Rights statement: © 2009 Batchelor et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Spatial predictions of Rhodesian Human African Trypanosomiasis (Sleeping Sickness) prevalence in Kaberamaido and Dokolo, two newly affected districts of Uganda

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  • Nicola A. Batchelor
  • Peter M. Atkinson
  • Peter W. Gething
  • Kim Picozzi
  • Eric M. Fèvre
  • Abbas S. L. Kakembo
  • Susan C. Welburn
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>15/12/2009
<mark>Journal</mark>PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Volume3
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)1-11
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The continued northwards spread of Rhodesian sleeping sickness or Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) within Uganda is raising concerns of overlap with the Gambian form of the disease. Disease convergence would result in compromised diagnosis and treatment for HAT. Spatial determinants for HAT are poorly understood across small areas. This study examines the relationships between Rhodesian HAT and several environmental, climatic and social factors in two newly affected districts, Kaberamaido and Dokolo. A one-step logistic regression analysis of HAT prevalence and a two-step logistic regression method permitted separate analysis of both HAT occurrence and HAT prevalence. Both the occurrence and prevalence of HAT were negatively correlated with distance to the closest livestock market in all models. The significance of distance to the closest livestock market strongly indicates that HAT may have been introduced to this previously unaffected area via the movement of infected, untreated livestock from endemic areas. This illustrates the importance of the animal reservoir in disease transmission, and highlights the need for trypanosomiasis control in livestock and the stringent implementation of regulations requiring the treatment of cattle prior to sale at livestock markets to prevent any further spread of Rhodesian HAT within Uganda.

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M1 - 12 © 2009 Batchelor et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.