Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Stability of retained austenite in martensitic ...

Associated organisational unit

Electronic data

  • RA_mechanical stability (1)

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Materials Science and Engineering: A. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Materials Science and Engineering: A, 711, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.msea.2017.10.103

    Accepted author manuscript, 18.9 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Stability of retained austenite in martensitic high carbon steels: Part II: Mechanical stability

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/01/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Materials Science and Engineering: A
Volume711
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)696-703
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date31/10/17
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The mechanical stability of retained austenite is explored in martensitic bearing steels under cyclic compressive stresses up to ∼106 cycles at 3GPa, combining X-ray diffraction and repetitive push testing. Finite element analysis and hardness testing were adopted to interpret the stress distribution across the specimen, and the stress-strain response was revealed. Austenite decomposition was observed for all samples regardless of the difference in their chemical composition and volume percentage. The decomposition is partial and a significant amount of austenite could be retained even after ∼106 stress cycles. A scenario revealing different stages of retained austenite behaviour under compressive stresses has been established. It is observed that retained austenite first decomposes during the first tens of cycles and at 103 cycles, whilst it remains stable at cycles ranging 102–103 and after 104. More importantly, results show the potential TRIP effect of retained austenite decomposition on dynamic hardening of bearing steels.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Materials Science and Engineering: A. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Materials Science and Engineering: A, 711, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.msea.2017.10.103