Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Sustainability practices of family and nonfamil...

Electronic data

  • MANUSCRIPT

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Technological Forecasting and Social Change. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 174, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/J.techfore.2021.121079

    Accepted author manuscript, 446 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 28/03/23

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Sustainability practices of family and nonfamily firms: A worldwide study

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published
Article number121079
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/01/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Technological Forecasting and Social Change
Volume174
Number of pages13
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date28/09/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

As sustainability is pivotal in combating the global warming and climate change crisis, we examine whether family firms differ from their nonfamily counterparts in the sustainability practices they adopt. Using a large sample of listed firms from 45 countries over an 8-year period, we show that family firms on average engage less in pollution prevention, green supply chain management, and green product development practices than nonfamily firms. Our results remain consistent after correcting for the endogeneity of family ownership, using alternative model specifications and variable definitions. Our findings hold important implications for both theory and practice.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Technological Forecasting and Social Change. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 174, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/J.techfore.2021.121079