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The Brief-HAPPI : a questionnaire to assess cognitions that distinguish between individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and non-clinical controls.

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The Brief-HAPPI : a questionnaire to assess cognitions that distinguish between individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and non-clinical controls. / Mansell, Warren; Jones, Steven H.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 93, No. 1-3, 07.2006, p. 29-34.

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@article{a37384c4f139421495ed03d4449aaedf,
title = "The Brief-HAPPI : a questionnaire to assess cognitions that distinguish between individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and non-clinical controls.",
abstract = "Background Despite developments in cognitive behavioural therapy for bipolar disorder, little is known about the specific dysfunctional beliefs that may predispose individuals to mania. Therefore a measure was specifically designed for this purpose based on a cognitive approach. The measure is called the Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI). Method Fifty-six individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 39 matched healthy controls completed a brief version of the HAPPI (Brief-HAPPI), the Internal State Scale, and the Hypomanic Interpretations Questionnaire (HIQ). Results The bipolar group scored higher on the overall Brief-HAPPI scale, higher on the forward items of the Brief-HAPPI, lower on the reverse items and no different on the filler items. The group differences in overall score remained when controlling for current self-reported symptoms of mania and depression, and recent history of hypomanic symptoms, yet within the bipolar group, Brief-HAPPI score was positively correlated with the level of symptoms. The Brief-HAPPI showed a sizeable correlation with the HIQ, yet each scale showed a significant and independent association with bipolar disorder. Conclusion The Brief-HAPPI assesses dysfunctional beliefs that are associated with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.",
keywords = "Mania, Depression, Dysfunctional attitudes, Appraisals, Cognitive bias",
author = "Warren Mansell and Jones, {Steven H.}",
year = "2006",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2006.04.004",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "29--34",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Brief-HAPPI : a questionnaire to assess cognitions that distinguish between individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and non-clinical controls.

AU - Mansell, Warren

AU - Jones, Steven H.

PY - 2006/7

Y1 - 2006/7

N2 - Background Despite developments in cognitive behavioural therapy for bipolar disorder, little is known about the specific dysfunctional beliefs that may predispose individuals to mania. Therefore a measure was specifically designed for this purpose based on a cognitive approach. The measure is called the Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI). Method Fifty-six individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 39 matched healthy controls completed a brief version of the HAPPI (Brief-HAPPI), the Internal State Scale, and the Hypomanic Interpretations Questionnaire (HIQ). Results The bipolar group scored higher on the overall Brief-HAPPI scale, higher on the forward items of the Brief-HAPPI, lower on the reverse items and no different on the filler items. The group differences in overall score remained when controlling for current self-reported symptoms of mania and depression, and recent history of hypomanic symptoms, yet within the bipolar group, Brief-HAPPI score was positively correlated with the level of symptoms. The Brief-HAPPI showed a sizeable correlation with the HIQ, yet each scale showed a significant and independent association with bipolar disorder. Conclusion The Brief-HAPPI assesses dysfunctional beliefs that are associated with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

AB - Background Despite developments in cognitive behavioural therapy for bipolar disorder, little is known about the specific dysfunctional beliefs that may predispose individuals to mania. Therefore a measure was specifically designed for this purpose based on a cognitive approach. The measure is called the Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI). Method Fifty-six individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 39 matched healthy controls completed a brief version of the HAPPI (Brief-HAPPI), the Internal State Scale, and the Hypomanic Interpretations Questionnaire (HIQ). Results The bipolar group scored higher on the overall Brief-HAPPI scale, higher on the forward items of the Brief-HAPPI, lower on the reverse items and no different on the filler items. The group differences in overall score remained when controlling for current self-reported symptoms of mania and depression, and recent history of hypomanic symptoms, yet within the bipolar group, Brief-HAPPI score was positively correlated with the level of symptoms. The Brief-HAPPI showed a sizeable correlation with the HIQ, yet each scale showed a significant and independent association with bipolar disorder. Conclusion The Brief-HAPPI assesses dysfunctional beliefs that are associated with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

KW - Mania

KW - Depression

KW - Dysfunctional attitudes

KW - Appraisals

KW - Cognitive bias

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2006.04.004

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2006.04.004

M3 - Journal article

VL - 93

SP - 29

EP - 34

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

IS - 1-3

ER -